Bio Notes for Presenters

Below are the biographical notes for all the presenters at ACCUTE 2019 (in alphabetical order).

Erin Akerman is a PhD candidate at Western University. She studies Indigenous, Canadian, and nineteenth-century British literatures, though she is currently working on a dissertation chapter that considers Romantic prophecy in transatlantic contexts and addresses the connection between this phenomenon and seventeenth-century prophecy.
Rusaba Alam is a PhD student in English Literature at the University of British Columbia.
Alicia Alves is a doctoral candidate at Queen’s University. She received her Master’s degree from Lakehead University. Her dissertation works on human-animal kinship, hybridity, and the intersections between childhood studies, animal studies, and queer theory in late-Victorian and Edwardian children’s literature.
Jennifer Andrews teaches at UNB and is delighted to be serving as the current President of ACCUTE.
Anderson Araujo is Associate Professor and Interim Head of the Department of Languages and World Literatures at UBC’s Okanagan campus. He has published a number of articles on Transatlantic Modernism and avant-garde movements. His monograph, A Companion to Ezra Pound’s Guide to Kulchur, was published in 2018.
Nana, a senior undergraduate enrolled in the Honours English program at Mount Royal University, has presented papers at the 3rd Annual Institute of African Studies Undergraduate Research Conference at Carleton University, the Philosophy, History, and Politics Undergraduate Conference at Thompson Rivers University, and the African Literature Association 2018 Conference.
Haythem Bastawy is a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy. His PhD is concerned with the influence of literature and art on British Imperial politics in the nineteenth century. He has published on various aspects of English and History
Dylan Bateman is a second-year PhD student in the English Language and Literatures Department at the University of British Columbia. His research focuses on the intersections of Critical Indigenous Studies, Critical Race Theory, and Animal Studies.
Nicholas Beauchesne is a PhD candidate and SSHRC doctoral fellow in the Department of English and Film Studies at the University of Alberta. His research interests lie in mysticism and its intersection with the other political and aesthetic radicalisms of modernism. As a longtime vocalist and stage performer, Nick has always been fascinated by the aesthetics of magical practice, especially in music and literature.
Karin Beeler is a Professor in the Department of English at the University of Northern British Columbia (Canada) where she teaches television genre and film studies courses. She has published several books on film and television (including the co-edited volume, Children’s Film in the Digital Age) and has guest edited a special issue on “Youth Culture in Film and Television” for Studies in the Humanities (2016).
Brent Ryan Bellamy is an Assistant Professor of Speculative Literature at Trent University (LTA). You can read his published work in Science Fiction Studies, Paradoxa, and Western American Literature among other venues. Ask him about his forthcoming collaborative project: An Ecotopian Lexicon (UMNP 2019)
Associate Professor at Dalhousie University, Lyn Bennett teaches classes in rhetoric, writing, and literature. As well as Rhetoric, Medicine and the Woman Writer, 1600-1700 (Cambridge UP, 2018), she has published numerous articles on topics rhetorical and literary. Her current research focuses on the rhetoric of the professions in early modern England and on recipe writing in the early modern Maritimes.
Jacob Bermel is PhD candidate in the Department of English at York University where he researches and writes on experimental poetry and poetics in both Canada and the US. He is co-editor of Pivot: A Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies & Thought and an occasional helper at Brick, A Literary Journal.
Gregory Betts is the Craig Dobbin Professor of Canadian Studies at University College Dublin, and Professor of English Language & Literature at Brock University. He is the author of Avant-Garde Canadian Literature: The Early Manifestations (2013) and co-editor with Christian Bök of Avant Canada: Artists, Prophets, Revolutionaries (2019, in press).
Nicole Birch-Bayley is a PhD candidate in English at the University of Toronto, where she researches post-1967 Canadian fiction. Her dissertation focuses on the sense of touch in Canadian national literature, specifically reading moments of tactile and affective contact as narrative expressions of belonging or disaffiliation within the multicultural nation-state.
Jordan Bolay studies questions of trace—the politics of presence in the archive—as a doctoral candidate in the University of Calgary’s English Department. He co-founded and co-edits for The Anti-Languorous Project, an online open-access hub for literary brevity. He writes poetry, short fiction, and creative criticism.
Natalie Boldt is a graduate student at the University of Victoria in Victoria, British Columbia. She holds a Master of Arts in Interdisciplinary Humanities from Trinity Western University and is currently working on her Ph.D. in English. Her focus areas include Canadian literature as well as speculative and science fiction.
English PhD candidate at Western University. English MA from Dalhousie University. SSHRC-funded dissertation “Contemporary Open World Video Games and the Settler Colonial Imaginary.” Cave goblin of the academy.
Shelley Boyd is a Canadian Literature specialist at Kwantlen Polytechnic University in Surrey, B.C. She is the author of Garden Plots: Canadian Women Writers and Their Literary Gardens (MQUP, 2013) and is currently co-editing an interdisciplinary collection of essays, interviews, and creative pieces on Canadian Culinary Imaginations. Nathalie Cooke is professor of English and associate dean of McGill University Library (rare and special collections). Her publications focus on the shaping of Canadian literary and culinary taste. Most recently, she is co-editor of Catharine Parr Traill’s The Female Emigrant’s Guide Cooking with a Canadian Classic (MQUP 2017).
Jane Boyes is a PhD candidate in English at Dalhousie University, where she specializes in digital and other forms of contemporary experimental literature, with emphasis on Canadian and marginalized perspectives.
Melissa Brennan is a second year PhD student at Wilfrid Laurier University, in Waterloo Ontario, researching Transmedia Adaptations of literature, participatory culture, and the aesthetics of reception. She received her BAH and MA in English from the University of New Brunswick in Fredericton.
Michael Brisbois teaches at both MacEwan University and Athabasca University. His current research focuses upon the representation of the Anglo-Welsh border. His prior research has focused on millenarian and apocalyptic thought in Modernism.
Emily Bruusgaard is a recent graduate of Queen’s University and currently an instructor at Trent University in Peterborough and Oshawa. Her research interests are in women’s texts and their relationships with textiles, particularly in the interwar period; trauma and mental illness in women’s literature; and social justice. She also hates writing bibliographies about herself.
Katharine Bubel recently completed her PhD in English at the University of Victoria. Her dissertation, “Edge Effects: Poetry, Place and Spiritual Practices,” investigates the work of Jeffers, Roethke, Hass, Levertov, and Zwicky. She teaches at Trinity Western University and has published in various journals, including Renascence, The Merton Annual, and North Wind.
Mark Buchanan is a PhD student at York University. His research focusses on food and alcohol within Canadian fantasy literature. He has also written on alcohol use in Harry Potter.
Valerie M. Buck is the Rare Anglo-American Literature Catalog Librarian at Brigham Young University. She has presented and published in many areas of librarianship, including for the American Library Association and the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions. Her areas of research include Victorian England and Women’s Studies.
Clint Burnham is Professor and Chair of the Graduate Program in English at Simon Fraser University. His most recent books are Pound @ Guantaánamo and Does the Internet have an Unconscious?
Meghan Burry is a first year PhD student at Queen’s University. She holds a Bachelor of Arts from the University of Prince Edward Island and a Master of Arts from Queen’s University. Her research is focused on the evolution of the fallen women in nineteenth century women’s prose.
Stephanie Butler completed a SSHRC-funded Ph.D. in English literature at Newcastle University and currently teaches in the Equity Studies Program at New College, University of Toronto
Michael Cameron is a first-year PhD student at Dalhousie University. He is the recipient of the Joseph Armand Bombardier CGS Master’s Scholarship and Dalhousie’s Special Provost-Alumni Scholarship. He is working towards a specialization in Anglo-American speculative fiction, with a particular focus on the post-apocalyptic.
Christine Campana is a PhD student at the University of Western Ontario. Having completed her primary field exam in Indigenous Literature and Criticism, Christine is now working on her dissertation, which focuses on contemporary poetry involving travel and movement authored by Indigenous, diasporic, and settler women residing in Canada.
Collin Campbell is a PhD candidate at Memorial University of Newfoundland, where he studies trauma, war, and media in Canadian poetry of the West coast.
Jodey Castricano is an Associate Professor in the Faculty of Creative and Critical Studies at the University of British Columbia, Okanagan where she teaches in the English and Cultural Studies programs. In English her specializations are in 19th century literature (gothic) as well as in cultural and critical theory. In the case of the latter, her primary area of expertise is in posthumanist philosophy and Critical Animal Studies with extended work in ecocriticsm, ecofeminism and ecotheory. The author of Cryptomimesis: The gothic and Jacques Derrida’s Ghost Writing she is also the contributing editor to Animal Subjects: An Ethical Reader in a Posthuman World (WLUP 2008) and Animal Subjects: 2.0 (WLUP 2017).
Courtney Church is a PhD Candidate at Western University. Her research interests include theater and performance in the twentieth century as it relates to Thing Theory. She maintains particular interest in the work of Samuel Beckett, Tom Stoppard, and Sarah Kane.
Anne Claret is a Ph.D. student in Interdisciplinary Studies at UBC Okanagan. She completed a Master’s Degree in English Literature at the Université Lumière Lyon II, and a Master’s in English Education at the École Normale Supérieure de Lyon, in France. Her research focuses on speculative fiction.
Dr. Bradley D. Clissold is Associate Professor of British Twentieth-Century Literature , Film, and Communication Theory. He has published articles on Candid Camera, James Joyce, Don DeLillo, Virginia Woolf, and The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz.
Fiona Coll is Assistant Professor of Literature and Technology at SUNY Oswego. Her work explores the mutual constitution of machine intelligence and human agency in nineteenth-century literature. She is working on a book project that traces the appearance and function of the automaton in nineteenth-century fictional, scientific, and political writing.
Krista Collier-Jarvis is currently pursuing a PhD at Dalhousie University. Her research analyzes intersections in the American gothic and popular culture, and she is currently working on a collaborative project on gerontophobia as well as the chthulucene in horror video games.
Andrew Connolly is an instructor in the Arts One program at UBC. He has published articles in the Canadian Review of American Studies, South: A Scholarly Journal, American Periodicals, and CEA Critic. His current work examines the marketing and promotion of occult, New Age, and spirituality books.
Dr. Heather Cyr is a faculty member in the Department of English at Kwantlen Polytechnic University where she teaches and researches Children’s and Fantasy literatures
Laura K. Davis has a Ph.D. in English from the University of Alberta, and is Chair of the Department of Humanities and Social Sciences at Red Deer College. She works in the area of Canadian literature, and her recent book, Margaret Laurence and Jack McClelland, Letters was co-edited with Linda M. Morra.
Samantha is a 2nd year doctoral student at York University, focusing on Canadian literature, the environment, and the institutionalization of Canadian literature. Her dissertation examines how the CBC’s annual Canada Reads competition helps shape which works are designated with the contested label of ‘CanLit.’
Misao Dean is a Professor in the English Department at the University of Victoria, and is the author of books and articles on Canadian poetry and Novels, and on nationalism in Canada.
Steven Defehr is a MA of English Literature student at UBCO. Steven is especially interested in American Literature, Victorian and Gothic Literature, and Critical Theory. Currently, Steven is working on a thesis focusing an attributive lens on Flight Behavior by American novelist Barbara Kingsolver.
Jacqui Deighton studies modernism and the middlebrow, and recently completed her MA at Dalhousie University.
J. Andrew Deman is a full-time lecturer at the University of Waterloo. His research is published in Femspec, Critical Survey of Graphic Novels, American Visual Memoir After the 1970s, English Studies Forum, TRANSverse, Canadian Graphic (winner of the 2017 Gabrielle Roy prize), and in his book The Margins of Comics.
Jo Devereux is an Assistant Professor in the Department of English and Writing Studies at Western University. She is the author of The Making of Women Artists in Victorian England (McFarland 2016) and of recent articles on Victorian women’s art education in the Victorian Review and the Victorian Periodicals Review.
Samantha Dewaele is currently completing a Master’s degree in English Literature at Lakehead University. Her SSHRC funded final project is a graphic novel that explores the social phenomenon of eco-anxiety surrounding climate change.
Gage Karahkwì:io Diabo is a Mohawk student from Kahnawake. He worked as an assistant director on APTN’s comedy series, Mohawk Girls. He also participated as a panelist and coordinator for the 2016 and 2017 editions of CBC Montreal’s Turtle Island Reads event series.
Max Dickeson is a PhD student in the Department of English and Film Studies at the University of Alberta. His research investigates the social and collaborative construction of narrative in tabletop roleplaying games.
Lindsay Diehl recently received her PhD in Critical Studies from the University of British Columbia, Okanagan campus, where she currently teaches. Her research focuses on racialized subjectivity within the fields of cultural studies, postcolonial theory, and Asian Canadian literature. Her work has appeared in Rupkatha, Postcolonial Text, and Canadian Literature.
Elizabeth is a senior undergraduate enrolled in the English Honours program at Mount Royal University. Her areas of scholarly interest include critical (mixed) race theory, monster theory, and postcolonialism. Upon graduation, the intends to pursue her Masters and PhD in English literature with a specialization in critical race theory.
Janey Dodd is a PhD candidate in the Department of English at the University of British Columbia where her work focusses on the intersections between poetry, site-specific performance, and archival practices in post-war American art communities.
Rhiannon Don has worked as an instructor in English Studies at Nipissing University since 2007, where she teaches first-year writing to a variety of different student cohorts. Outside of teaching, she is committed to improving the working conditions of contract academics. She is also an avid knitter and curler.
Matthew Dunleavy in a PhD candidate at York University. His work examines the gender politics in the writing of the Late-Victorian slum reformers, with a focus on Clementina Black and Margaret Harkness. He is the recipient of the SSHRC Joseph-Armand Bombardier CGS, the St. George Society of Toronto Endowment, and the Ontario Graduate Scholarship.
Alicia Edwards is a PhD candidate with the Manchester Centre for Gothic Studies, Manchester Metropolitan University, UK. Her thesis explores London Ghost tourism and mapping ‘Haunted London’. She has published an on Jack the Ripper tourism and a historical case study on a haunted ruin and its intersections with literature.
Elizabeth Effinger teaches eighteenth- and nineteenth-century literature at the University of New Brunswick. She co-edited William Blake’s Gothic Imagination: Bodies of Horror (2018). She is Principal Investigator of “Erasing Frankenstein,” a SSHRC-funded public humanities project that transformed Shelley’s 1818 novel into a book-length erasure poem in collaboration with incarcerated and non-incarcerated artists.
Sharon Engbrecht is a PhD Candidate at the University of British Columbia. Her work focuses on the causal relationship between gender, sexuality, and romantic scripting in post-1945 British and Canadian Novels.
Mahdiyeh Ezzatikarami is a PhD student at the University of Western Ontario. She is primarily interested in modes of self-Orientalizing in Muslim narratives and maintains a particular interest in the role of memoirs published by women from Islamic background in creating a transnational identity.
Roger Farr is the author of three books of poetry. His critical writing on autonomous social movements and the avant-garde appears in numerous periodicals, including Anarchist Studies, The Encyclopaedia of Protest and Revolution, Fifth Estate, Perspectives on Anarchist Theory, The Poetic Front, West Coast Line, and XCP: Cross Cultural Poetics. He is Convener of Creative Writing at Capilano University in Vancouver, and lives on Gabriola Island, Snuneymuxw territory.
Ryan Fitzpatrick is a SSHRC postdoctoral fellow at the University of Toronto Scarborough where he works on contemporary poetics and literature in Canada after the spatial turn.
Lauren Fournier is a writer, curator, artist, and interdisciplinary researcher working across literature, art history and theory, gender studies, and studio practice. She holds a PhD from York University. Her writing has been published in such scholarly journals as a/b: Auto/Biography Studies, Contemporary Women’s Writing, and West Coast Line.
Graham Fraser is Assistant Professor of Modern and Contemporary Literature at Mount Saint Vincent University. He has published on hauntedness in the fiction of Samuel Beckett, Jean Rhys, Virginia Woolf, and M. John Harrison.
Andrew French is a Graduate Student at the University of British Columbia pursuing a Master of Arts in English. Andrew’s focus is on Canadian poetics, with particular attention to spatial, romantic, and historical poetry. Beyond his academics, Andrew’s poetry has been published in Canadian, British, and American literary journals.
Professor and Chair of the Department of English, Concordia University, Andre Furlani is the author of Beckett after Wittgenstein and Guy Davenport: Postmodern and After. Recent publications have appeared in PMLA, Canadian Literature, Modernism/modernity, Philosophy and Literature, and Bréac, as well as in Speaking Memory: How Translation Shapes City Life.
Sara Gallagher is a PhD Candidate at the University of Waterloo whose research is situated around African American literature, history, and print culture, as well as American regionalism and literary geographies.
Lise Gaston is a PhD Candidate in English at UC Berkeley. She has published articles on gender and political economy in European Romantic Review and Nineteenth-Century Contexts. Her first book of poetry, Cityscapes in Mating Season was released last year by Signature Editions.
Loren Gaudet is a PhD candidate in the Department of English Language and Literature at University of British Columbia. She specializes in the Rhetoric of Health and Medicine and Science and Technology Studies.
Mitchell Gauvin is currently completing a PhD in English at York University in Toronto, Canada. His research examines contemporary citizenship rhetoric and its literary origins, exploring the role of post-World War II fiction in constituting how we conceive of personhood and political membership.
Lizette Gerber is an English MA student at the University of Saskatchewan. She is interested in genre fiction (particularly horror and sci-fi) and the depiction of racialized bodies within such literature.
Kristina Getz is a PhD Candidate in the Department of English at York University. Her dissertation, “Portraits of the Artist as Mother: Feminist Reconfigurations of the Maternal in Modern and Contemporary Canadian Literature,” employs feminist and maternal theory in order to explore the intersection of motherhood and creativity.
Rohan Ghatage is a doctoral candidate at the University of Toronto where he studies twentieth-century American literature.
Christopher Giannakopoulos is a doctoral candidate in English at the University of Waterloo, specializing in rhetoric and transnational British and Irish literature. His research currently explores the rhetorics of representation and epistemology in the poetry and prose works of Jan Zwicky, Paul Muldoon, Don Paterson, and Robert Creeley.
W. Mark Giles is a contract academic worker who has taught English, creative writing, and composition across Canada. He has written two award-winning books. He lives and works in Calgary on the traditional territories of the Blackfoot and the people of the Treaty 7 region in Southern Alberta.
W. Mark Giles is a contract academic worker who has taught English, creative writing, and composition across Canada. He has written two award-winning books. He lives and works in Calgary on the traditional territories of the Blackfoot and the people of the Treaty 7 region in Southern Alberta.
Deserae Gogel is in the first year of her Master of Arts in English at the University of British Columbia Okanagan. She completed her B.A. and B.Ed. at the University of Lethbridge in 2016. She taught for two years (abroad and in Lethbridge), before attending UBCO.
Marion Grant is a graduate student in Ryerson University’s MA program in the Literatures of Modernity. She is a Student Research Fellow at Ryerson’s Centre for Digital Humanities, where she focuses on Personography datasets, data visualization, and TEI markup for The Yellow Nineties Online (www.1890s.ca).
Brenna Clarke Gray holds a PhD from the University of New Brunswick and teaches at Douglas College. She publishes on comics in Canada and representations of Canada in mainstream American comic books.
Phillip Grayson is an Assistant Professor of English at Tennessee State University. His work engages the role of the fictional in the world.
Steven Greenwood is a PhD at McGill University student researching the relationship between queer communities and popular culture. He is particularly interested in forms of popular culture with connections to fairy tales, folklore, oral history, or community formation. He is also a director, playwright, and improviser in Montreal, Quebec.
Claudia Grigg Edo is a scholar from London, currently based in Los Angeles. She achieved her BA in English Literature from the University of Cambridge and is currently a graduate student, researching intersections of gender, class and intimacy in the Aesthetics and Politics department at California Institute of the Arts.
Dr. George C. Grinnell is Associate Professor in the Department of English and Cultural Studies at UBC, Okanagan Campus. He is the author of numerous publications on topics such as Romanticism, biometrics, veiling, hypochondria, political terror, and he is presently researching punk as a form of public pedagogy.
In her research, Elizabeth Gripping focuses on literature by women in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Although she works primarily in Canadian literature, she also has a strong interest in environmental literature. Elizabeth currently serves as the coordinator of the writing centre and tutoring services at Ambrose University.
Stephen Guy teaches writing at SAIT and Bow Valley College in Calgary. He holds a PhD in English from Queen’s, and he likes to ski downhill and cross country.
Arash Hajbabaee is an international MA scholar of English Literature at University of Windsor from Tehran, Iran. He acquired his Bachelor’s in English Language and Literature in Iran. His thesis project focuses on video game narratives and the effects of ludic systems and mechanics on them.
From the Windigo, to Japanese ghost lore, and of course zombies, I have long been fascinated with intersections between fact and myth. Receiving my B.A. in Honours English from MacEwan University, I have brought my passions to the M.A. program of Queen’s and wish to keep the occult conversation rolling.
Roxanne Harde is Professor of English at the University of Alberta. A Fulbright Scholar and McCalla Professor, Roxanne researches and teaches American literature and culture, including children’s/YA literature. Her most recent book is The Embodied Child, coedited with Lydia Kokkola; she currently is researching sexual assault in YA novels.
Dominic Hardy is professor, Québec and Canadian art history at the Université du Québec à Montréal. A specialist in the history of caricature and graphic satire, he heads the activities of the team preparing the first survey of Québec art history at UQAM’s Laboratoire numérique des études en histoire de l’art du Québec (LANÉHAQ).
Jason Haslam is Professor of English at Dalhousie. His research pivots around American cultural studies, with particular focuses on prison studies, science fiction, and the gothic. He has recently published the monograph Gender, Race, and American Science Fiction, the textbook Thinking Popular Culture, and the essay collection American Gothic Culture.
Roxanne Hearn is a PHD student from Wilfrid Laurier University. Her research focuses on gender and sexual representation in dance film, but her interdisciplinary interests culminate in her use of mainstream feminist film theory to analyse film and literature across various genres and disciplines.
Alison Hedley is a SSHRC Postdoctoral Fellow at McGill and editor of the Yellow Nineties Personography. She has published in Victorian Periodicals Review and the Journal of Victorian Culture; she’s writing a book about popular illustrated magazines and the changing media landscape of Britain at the turn of the century.
Miriam Helmers is completing a Masters in English language at UBC and applying for a PhD in English for 2019. Her work focuses on figurative language in Charles Dickens. She holds bachelor degrees in English literature from the UofT and theology from the university of the Holy Cross in Rome.
Letitia Henville is the Coordinator, Graduate Programs, UBC Arts Co-op Office, and an award-winning teacher and editor. Claire Battershill holds a Banting Postdoctoral Fellowship in English Literature at SFU and is the author of Modernist Lives: Biography and Autobiography at Virginia and Leonard Woolf’s Hogarth Press (Bloomsbury 2018).
Scott Herder is a PhD candidate in the Department of English at the University of Toronto. His dissertation, After the Event: Commemoration and Literature in Canada, examines works of literature that correspond with, and redefine, how various historical events are shaped in collective memories.
Shandell Houlden is a PhD Candidate at McMaster University. Her research examines the ways in which canine life is both conscripted to and resistant to anthropocentric projects of war. She is also a researcher at Royal Roads University, where she investigates online harassment of women academics.
Emily Howe is a doctoral student at York University. Her area of expertise is the post-1945 American road narrative with a particular focus on the experience of marginalization from mainstream culture. Her current research focuses on the way that gender, race, and class effect one’s experience of mobility.
Shelley Hulan is an Associate Professor and Chair of the Department of English Language and Literature at the University of Waterloo. She researches early Canadian women writers, the histories of the new imperialism and Idealism in late 19th-century Canada, and representations of food scarcity in the late British empire.
Kasim Husain has a PhD in English and Cultural Studies from McMaster, and has published on race, sexuality, and neoliberalism in contemporary British writing in Postcolonial Text, South Asian History and Culture, and the Cambridge Companion to British Fiction since 1945. He teaches media studies in UBC’s Coordinated Arts Program.
Olivia is a settler academic and poet in the city colloquially known as Vancouver, BC. Her MA research at Simon Fraser University focuses on the constructions, tensions, and politics of space in avant-garde poetry and the archive. Olivia received a CGS-SSHRC grant for work on Frank O’Hara’s Oranges: 12 Pastorals.
Brad Jackson is a PhD student in the department of English Language and Literature at the University of British Columbia. His interests include cognitive poetics, conceptual blending, multimodal forms of communication, multimodal expressions of figurative language, Shakespeare, and the relationship between cognition and the material aspects of theatre and film.
David Janzen is a Lecturer in Communication Arts at the University of Waterloo. His recent work engages theories of crisis, subjectivity, and environment, as well as more experimental work with sound and rhythm. He is currently finishing a book on Marx, Badiou and the politics of crisis.
Sebastian Johnston-Lindsay is a Ph.D. student in Canadian Studies at Trent University where his research takes up questions of race and space in contemporary Canadian novels, specifically those of Rawi Hage and Dionne Brand. A secondary research focus has recently been in Canadian popular music and nationalism, specifically in the work of The Tragically Hip.
Diana Jones is a Ph.D. student at York University and holds a BA Hons. (2013) and an MA (2015) from Memorial University. Her research focuses on Early Modern representations of Greek and Roman culture and traces the presence of female exemplars from the classical period to the Renaissance stage.
Miriam Jones teaches eighteenth-century literature at the University of New Brunswick in Saint John. She has published articles about George Eliot, ballads, street literature, vampires, science fiction, and erotic literature. Her current project involves early-modern writing manuals.
Born in Edmonton and having completed her undergraduate degree in Chemistry and English, Umama Jutt is currently pursuing her Master’s in English at the University of Windsor, with an emphasis on Canadian literature and postcolonial studies. Her work is focused on the portrayal of marginalized Canadians in award-winning Canadian novels.
Sarah Karlson is currently a PhD student at the University of Victoria. Sarah is interested in narratives of monstrosity in Victorian fiction, especially vampires. Her research focuses on the vampire as a reiteration of Victorian anxiety and sexually transmitted diseases, and specifically how men function within vampire narratives.
Joel Katelnikoff holds a PhD from the University of Alberta. He is currently compiling a collection of Recombinant Theory, remixing the poetic and critical work of ten writers, including Annharte, Charles Bernstein, Christian Bök, Johanna Drucker, Lyn Hejinian, Steve McCaffery, Erín Moure, Sawako Nakayasu, Lisa Robertson, and Fred Wah.
Paul Keen is the author of Literature, Commerce, and the Spectacle of Modernity, 1750-1800 (2012), The Crisis of Literature in the 1790s: Print Culture and the Public Sphere (1999), and A Defense of the Humanities in a Utilitarian Age: Imagining What We Know, 1800-1850 (forthcoming with Palgrave Macmillan).
Christopher Keep is an Associate Professor at the Western University, and editor of the Victorian Review. He has published widely on Victorian literature and information technologies, disability studies, and the organization of knowledge.
Gary Kelly (University of Alberta) teaches English and Comparative Literature. He has published research in women’s writing, the novel, and popular print culture of the Romantic period. He is General Editor of the ongoing Oxford History of Popular Print Culture. Current projects include Modern Fun and Sixpenny Romanticism.
Niyosha is a PhD Candidate at the Department of English and the Centre for Diaspora and Transnational Studies at the University of Toronto. Her research focuses on memoirs of the Iranian diaspora, and literatures of exile and displacement.
Asma Khaliq is an English PhD student at University of Waterloo with an academic interest in New Media, visual rhetoric, and graphic design.
Shoilee Khan is a doctoral student in English at York University. Her academic work most recently appeared in Confluences 2 (Mawenzi, 2017). Her recent fiction appeared in the short story collection The Unpublished City (BookThug, 2017). She is a member of the Planning Committee for the Festival of Literary Diversity.
Adrian Knapp holds a PhD from the University of Leeds and is adjunct professor in the Department of English Language and Literature at Saint Mary’s University in Halifax. His research focuses on early black writing in Britain and the depiction of black characters in eighteenth-century literature.
Jennifer Komorowski is a PhD student Western University. Her research focuses on avant-garde women’s writing which works to create a new language outside the current phallogocentric order. As a woman from the Oneida Nation of the Thames she has a particular interest in Indigenous women’s writing.
Kristine Kowalchuk studies food and land-use writing. She completed her doctorate at the University of Alberta in 2012. Her critical edition Preserved on Paper: Seventeenth-Century Englishwomen’s Receipt Books was published by the University of Toronto Press in 2017. She is a full-time instructor at the Northern Alberta Institute of Technology.
Alexandrine is an MA student at Queen’s University. Her interests are directed towards Modernist literature, Sound Studies, and Women’s writings.
Danielle LaFrance lives, writes, and works on occupied and stolen xʷməθkʷəy̓əm, Skwxwú7mesh Úxwumixw, and səl̓ílwətaʔɬ lands. She is the author of Species Branding (CUE 2010), Friendly + Fire (Talonbooks 2016), and the chapbook Pink Slip (SIC 2013). A forthcoming book JUST LIKE I LIKE IT is expected Autumn 2019 via Talonbooks. Her new poetry project is called #postdildo, which thinks and acts through fucking, fantasy, rape culture, and modes of communication. She is invested in listening and/or addressing and/or responding to the radical root of things. Always yearning for revolutionary possibilities that are often already available with the right high kick.
Bethany Langmaid is a SSHRC-funded MA student in UNB Fredericton’s English Department. She loves literature, languages, music, and all other mediums that allow people to better empathize with each other.
Heather Latimer is an Assistant Professor of Gender and Women’s Studies at UBC Okanagan, where she studies and teaches on reproductive politics.
Robert is a doctoral candidate at Corpus Christi College, Oxford, having completed previous degrees at McGill and the University of Toronto. His research explores the relationship between Victorian politics and adaptations of popular novels on the nineteenth-century stage, and how adaptation as a historical phenomenon has informed modern versions of the same practice.
Robert Lecker is Greenshields Professor of English Literature at McGill University. He is the author and editor of numerous studies of Canadian literature and of several anthologies of Canadian poetry and fiction. He is currently completing a history of Canadian writers and their literary agents.
Charles Ledbetter is a PhD Student at the University of Tübingen, Germany. His dissertation focuses on the intersection of trans and posthuman selfhoods in speculative fiction.
Nahmi Lee is a PhD candidate from the University of Western Ontario. Her research specialties include mid-Victorian fiction, new materialism, and nineteenth-century applications of ecocriticism.
Benjamin Lefebvre is the editor of the Early Canadian Literature series (WLUP), The L.M. Montgomery Library (UTP), and the three-volume critical anthology /The L.M. Montgomery Reader/ (2013–15), which won the 2016 PROSE Award for Literature from the Association of American Publishers.
Lisa Surridge and Mary Elizabeth Leighton are Victorianist colleagues in English at UVic. Their book, The Plot Thickens: Illustrated Victorian Fiction from Dickens to Du Maurier, is in press with Ohio UP. Their new book project, Great Expectations, studies pregnancy, representation, and narrative form in Victorian fiction.
Joanne Leow is Assistant Professor in the Department of English at the University of Saskatchewan. She has published in Journal of Commonwealth Literature, Canadian Literature, Studies in Canadian Literature, Journal of Postcolonial Writing and Journal of Asian American Studies. She is completing a book manuscript on authoritarianism, space, and contemporary texts from Singapore.
Founder and CEO of Broadview Press, Don LePan is also the author of two novels, a monograph on Shakespeare’s plots, and, in recent years, a number of papers in Victorian Studies and Animal Studies. He holds degrees from Carleton and from Sussex, and an honorary doctorate from Trent.
Marisa Lewis is a doctoral student in English at the University of Ottawa. Her research focuses on Canadian cultural memory and decolonial pedagogical practices. Her dissertation project seeks to examine cross-cultural solidarities and coalitions as sites of learning in contemporary Canadian works of memory.
Andrew LiVecchi is a PhD candidate at Western University. His research tracks the intersecting strands of imperialism, medievalism, and masculinity in several literary moments of British imperial literature from the 1850s to the 1950s, and he works on such authors as Malory, Kipling, Haggard, and T. H. White.
Lucia Lorenzi is a SSHRC Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of English and Cultural Studies at McMaster University. Her research focuses on the intersections of gendered violence with public discourse and memory, as well as on Blackness and archival practices in Canadian literary communities.
I teach in English and in the Coordinated Arts Program at UBC. My work on literature, memory, and witness has appeared in English Studies in Canada, Memory Studies and Tulsa Studies in Women’s Literature. A new essay on poetry pedagogies is forthcoming in Pedagogy and I am the author of a book of poetry (Ragtime for Beginners, 2008).
I am Sally Luken, a Master of Arts in Literature and Cultural Studies student at the University of Cincinnati. My interests include gothic studies – particularly in relation to eating disorder studies, cultural poetics, seventeenth-century poetry, and European religious history.
Celiese Lypka is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of English at the University of Calgary, specializing in women’s writing, modernist literature, and feminist theory. Her current research investigates productive modes of divergent femininity found within modernist texts that reorient anxiety attached to the female body toward a mobilizing affect of potentiality and power.
Krista Lysack is an associate professor of English at King’s University College at Western University. Her second book, Chronometres: Devotional Literature, Duration, and Victorian Reading, is in production at Oxford University Press. Her new research focuses on Victorian literature, weather, and the new materialist and ecological turns.
Dr. Elizabeth D. Macaluso teaches British literature and rhetoric and composition at Binghamton University where she received her doctoral degree. Elizabeth has published her poetry in VIA, Arba Sicula, The Paterson Literary Review, and The San Diego Poetry Annual. Also, her critical book manuscript (her revised dissertation) is under contract with Palgrave Macmillan Press. The title of this book is Gender, The New Woman, and The Monster. Elizabeth has earned the Alfred Bendixen Award for Distinguished Teaching by a Graduate Student in English and The Graduate Student Excellence Award in Teaching as a result of her mentorship of Binghamton University undergraduates. Elizabeth also has received numerous awards and opportunities to present her work at national and international conferences. She is currently on the academic job market and she lives with her family in New York.
Janet MacArthur teaches autobiography and women’s literature at UBC Okanagan. She has published and presented papers on settler colonialism and Holocaust literature.
Anna E. MacDonald is a PhD candidate at the University of British Columbia. Her research focuses on the intersection of women’s bodily fluids – menstrual, lactational, venereal – and larger social anxieties about the circulation of public fluids such as cow’s milk and drinking water.
Jessi MacEachern is a PhD candidate at the Université de Montréal. Her essay “The Feminist Poet Re-Creates the Soundscape: The Excessive Noise of Lisa Robertson and Rachel Zolf” is in Studies in Canadian Literature 42.2. Her poem “A Number of Stunning Attacks” was longlisted for the 2018 CBC Poetry Prize.
Britt MacKenzie-Dale is a Creative Writing PhD student at The University of New Brunswick. Her research interests include Critical Animal Studies, Gothic Literature, and how creative writing can connect the two. Originally from British Columbia’s Kootenay region, she currently lives in Fredericton, New Brunswick.
Dr. Gregory Maillet is Professor of English at Crandall University in Moncton, New Brunswick, Canada. A literary generalist, he has published articles on a wide variety of authors, and two recent books on Shakespeare: Learning to See the Theological Vision of Shakespeare’s King Lear (2016) and Reading Othello as Catholic Tragedy (2018). He is a also co-author, with David LyleJeffrey, of a book entitled Christianity and Literature: Philosophical Foundations and Critical Practice (2011).
Bronwyn Malloy is a CGS-SSHRC-funded PhD Candidate in English at UBC whose research focuses on contemporary poetry and alternative song. Bronwyn’s dissertation combines her interests in literary theory, music, and pedagogy. Bronwyn is a Killam GTA Award-winning TA at UBC, and an Instructor at Corpus Christi College.
Karen Manarin is Professor of English at Mount Royal University where she teaches writing and literature courses. Her research areas include reading, undergraduate research, and academic identity. Lead author of Critical Reading in Higher Education: Academic Goals and Social Engagement, she has also published in teaching and learning journals.
Nevena Martinović is a doctoral candidate at Queen’s University in the Department of English Language and Literature. Her dissertation examines the presentation and reception of ageing actresses in the long eighteenth century. She is the President of ACCUTE’s Graduate Student Caucus.
Carmen Faye Mathes is a British Romanticist and Assistant Professor at the University of Central Florida in Orlando. Dr. Mathes has published essays and book reviews in European Romantic Review, Romantic Circles Praxis, Studies in Romanticism and Modern Philology. She is currently at work on a book about British Romanticism, entitled The Disappointment Aesthetic.
Kelly McDevitt is a settler scholar and a third-year doctoral candidate in English Language & Literature at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario, located on the ancestral territories of the Haudenosaunee and Anishinaabe people. Her doctoral research examines gendered technologies and artificial lifeforms in twentieth-century Science Fiction.
Colleen McDonell is her first year of the PhD in English and the Book History and Print Culture specialization at the University of Toronto and is the NAVSA Canadian Graduate Representative for 2019-2020. Her research interests include Victorian fantasy and horror literature, representations of motherhood, periodical culture, and digital humanities.
*will update when presenter roster determined
Cameron McFarlane teaches Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Literature and Cultural Studies at Nipissing University. He has published on the Restoration on stage and screen, and also on disaster films.
Elizabeth teaches at Durham College and Fleming College. In 2017, she initiated an Information Literacy research project and presented the findings at the 2019 OLA Conference. She currently sits on the board of directors at the Literacy Council of Durham Region.
Torin McLachlan is a PhD student learning and working on the traditional, ancestral, and unceded territory of the Musqueam people, at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver. He enjoys talking about affect, apocalypse, and global avant-gardes.
Laurie McNeill is a Senior Instructor (English) and Chair of First-Year Programs at the University of British Columbia, where Kristi Carey works in education research. In addition to their personal research interests on narrative and higher education, respectively, they study the practices of teaching and learning academic integrity in Canadian universities.
Kevin McNeilly teaches in the Department of English Language and Literatures at the University of British Columbia. Poetry, audio, video and more can be found at kevinmcneilly.ca
Geordie Miller is a Contract Academic Faculty member at Mount Allison and Dalhousie. He has organized and participated in panels devoted to the topic of academic precarity and labour exploitation at a variety of conferences, including Congress, the American Comparative Literature Association, and the Canadian Association of American Studies.
Michelle Miller is a lecturer in English at the Ontario College of Art and Design University in Toronto. Her work is around representations of (queer) adolescence in coming-of-age comics. She teaches in trans and queer literature and comics, and has been published in Girlhood Studies and English Studies in Canada.
Gabrielle Mills is a Master’s student in Dalhousie University’s Department of English. Her research explores the intersections of contemporary Canadian poetry, social movements, and environmental policy. She is the recipient of a Joseph-Armand Bombardier Canada Graduate Scholarship and Nova Scotia Research and Innovation Graduate Scholarship.
Michael Minor teaches and studies decolonization through Indigenous literatures. He is a proud faculty member of the University of Manitoba in the Inner City Social Work Program and graduated with a PhD in English Literature from the University of Manitoba in 2016.
Ian Moy is a settler-scholar from Ontario where he completed his B.A. at Trent and his B.Ed. and M.A. at Queen’s. He is currently in his second year of the PhD program at the University of Saskatchewan where his research focusses on Canadian literature, specifically questions of transnationalism and identity.
Gillian Nangreave is a current MA candidate in the Department of English and Writing Studies at Western University. Her research interests include Middle English literature, medieval literary culture, and the history of the book.
Jonathan Nash is a first year PhD Student of English at the University of Victoria. Jonathan is interested in what ways representations of the migrant boat have shaped, historically and conceptually, narratives and identities of migration and citizenship in Canada.
Mervyn Nicholson is author of Male Envy: The Logic of Malice and 13 Ways of Looking at Images: Studies in the Logic of Visualization, as well as oodles of articles in journals such as Monthly Review, Journal of the History of Ideas, PMLA, brightlightsfilm, Literature/Film Quarterly, Nineteenth-Century Contexts, Wordsworth Circle.
Janice Niemann is a third-year PhD candidate at the University of Victoria, working under the supervision of Dr. Lisa Surridge on her dissertation, titled “Two in the Bush: Shrubberies, Lime-Walks, and Deviant Behaviour in 19th-century British Novels”. Her research interests include domestic fiction, children’s literature, garden and landscape history, and garden spaces in the novel.
Nicola Nixon is Associate Professor of English at Concordia University. Specializing in nineteenth-century American literature, she has published articles on Melville and James in PMLA, American Literature, and ELH, and on serial killers and cyperpunk fiction.
Vanessa Nunes is a PhD candidate in the department of English, Theatre, Film & Media at the University of Manitoba and a RA at the Centre for Globalization and Cultural Studies. Her SSHRC-funded doctoral thesis examines textual encounters between Brazil and Canada
Paul Ohler teaches at Kwantlen Polytechnic University. He is immediate past president of the Edith Wharton Society and editor of the Edith Wharton Review. His current projects include editing Volume 2, Short Stories I: 1891-1903 of The Complete Works of Edith Wharton, which is supported by a SSHRC Insight grant.
Sarah Olutola is a graduate of the Department of English and Cultural Studies at McMaster University and the current Gordon F. Henderson postdoctoral fellow at the University of Ottawa. Her current research concerns representations of race in popular media culture, Western humanitarianism, critical race theory, post-colonialism and global capitalism.
Ruth Panofsky is Professor of English at Ryerson University where she teaches Canadian Literatures and Culture. Her publications include The Literary Legacy of the Macmillan Company of Canada: Making Books and Mapping Culture (2012) and the award-winning Collected Poems of Miriam Waddington: A Critical Edition (2014).
Dr. Jamie Paris is an Assistant Professor of English at Corpus Christi College at the University of British Columbia. His primary research addresses the relationship between gender, religion, and race in the early modern period. Dr. Paris also works on First Nation’s Literatures in Canada.
Dana Patrascu-Kingsley has a Ph.D. in English from York University (Toronto, Canada), M.A. from Carleton University (Ottawa, Canada), and a B.A. in English and Romanian from the University of Bucharest (Romania). She has taught a variety of courses in English, Children’s Studies, and Humanities at York University and Ryerson University. Her research focuses on multiculturalism, ethnicity, race and gender in Canadian culture.
Robyn Peers is a graduate student in the Rhetoric and Communication Design program at the University of Waterloo, where she completed her Honors Bachelor of Arts in English Literature and Language in 2018.
Donna Palmateer Pennee works at Western University Canada. Her current research is on the affective legacy of United Empire Loyalism in the spectral racial history of canonical white anglophone literature in Ontario.
Helen Pinsent Graduated Dalhousie in 2018 with her MA. Before pursuing her PhD, she is taking a hiatus year, though she is still waiting for the “hiatus” part. She is currently a Teaching Assistant in Dal’s English and Computer Science departments, always making time for independent research and creative writing.
Julia Polyck-O’Neill is an artist, curator, critic, and writer. She is a doctoral candidate in Brock University’s Interdisciplinary Humanities program, where she is completing a SSHRC-funded interdisciplinary and comparative critical study of contemporary conceptualist literature and art in Vancouver.
Sara Press is a PhD candidate in UBC’s department of English Language and Literatures and STS. Her work in postcolonial theory critiques scientific knowledge construction and interrogates how the standardization of medical bodies has been used to reinforce a Eurocentric ideal of health, for both the individual and the nation.
Concetta Principe has a PhD from the Humanities Department at York University (2014). A portion of her thesis was published by Palgrave MacMillan, titled, Secular Messiahs and the Return of Paul’s Real: A Lacanian Approach, (2015). She teaches at Trent University in Durham.
Tavleen Purewal is a Doctoral Candidate in the Department of English at University of Toronto. She studies Black Canadian and Indigenous literature and theory.
Toben Racicot achieved a Bachelor’s of Creative Writing from BYU-Idaho. He works as a freelance writer, letterer, and designer in the indie comics scene and self publishes his own comics illustrated by his wife, Alaire. His research interests include sequential art, rhetoric of comic books, game theory, and sequential rhetoric.
Jaclyn Reed is a 4th year PhD Candidate at Western University whose research focuses on temporality in the novels of contemporary women writers. She completed her master’s degree in 2013 at the University of Denver with a thesis on satire in women’s novels that focused on Austen, Compton-Burnett, and Spark.
Kaitlyn Reid is a PhD student at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario. Her work primarily focusses on theatre, performance, audience affect, and adaptation and revisioning studies in the Early Modern, Restoration, and Victorian periods. She is currently pursuing a project on theatrical renderings of Elizabeth I on the Early Modern stage.
Nathan Richards-Velinou is a PhD student in the English Department at McGill University. His current doctoral project, supervised by Fiona Ritchie, explores gendered performances in the drama of the long eighteenth century, with a particular focus on representations of masculinity and sexuality in Restoration adaptations of Shakespeare.
Patricia Rigg is professor of Victorian Literature at Acadia University. She has published books on Robert Browning and Augusta Webster and has completed a book on A. Mary F. Robinson. With support of a SSHRC grant, she is working on the influence of Charles Baudelaire on Victorian autobiographical sonnet sequences.
Sarah Rose graduated from the Masters of Arts Program in the Humanities at the University of Chicago in May 2018, where she studied the intersection of Native American literature and Western philosophy with a focus on the ways in which Indigenous stories may transform colonial philosophies for the better.
Sara Rozenberg is a PhD student in the Department of English at York University. She holds an MA from the Women and Gender Studies Institute at the University of Toronto and an MA in English from York. Sara’s current research focuses on poetics and embodiment within critical theory, including postcolonial, diaspora, and Indigenous studies.
Scott Russell completed his BSc in plant ecology at UBC in 2012. His current work focuses on insanity and inhuman being in Middle English romance, with secondary interests in contemporary horror and dark fantasy genre fiction. He has also presented on 17th century English nationalism in The Birth of Merlin.
Rebecca Salazar is a writer, editor, and Vanier graduate scholar at the University of New Brunswick. Her research focuses on intersectional ecocriticism in literature and creative writing. Recent publications include poetry and non-fiction in periodicals across Canada, and the knife you need to justify the wound (Rahila’s Ghost Press).
Diana Samu-Visser is a doctoral candidate at the University of Western Ontario. Her research focuses on narrative medicine, technologies of body preservation, theories of the archive, and posthuman ethics.
Andrew Sargent is a third-year PhD Candidate at Western University. His research examines citation in British Romantic literature as a deconstructive, non-totalizing aesthetic that unsettles the period’s literary, political, and cultural totalities. His email is asargen@uwo.ca.
Leif Schenstead-Harris received a Bachelor’s degree from the University of Saskatchewan, a Master’s degree in English literature from University, a Master’s degree in public policy and public administration from Concordia, and a doctorate from Western University—not in that order. He has published in Mosaic, Crossings: A Journal of Migration and Culture, Caribbean-Irish Connections, and the Weird Fiction Review, among other venues, and he has worked at six institutions of higher education across Eastern Canada. He is currently employed by the Government of Canada.
Leif Schenstead-Harris received a Bachelor’s degree from the University of Saskatchewan, a Master’s degree in English literature from University, a Master’s degree in public policy and public administration from Concordia, and a doctorate from Western University—not in that order. He has published in Mosaic, Crossings: A Journal of Migration and Culture, Caribbean-Irish Connections, and the Weird Fiction Review, among other venues, and he has worked at six institutions of higher education across Eastern Canada. He is currently employed by the Government of Canada.
Judith Scholes has a PhD in English from the University of British Columbia, with specialization in nineteenth-century American literature, women’s poetry and editing, and gendered rhetoric and authorship. She teaches at UBC and her chapter on Emily Dickinson’s circulated poems is forthcoming in the Oxford Handbook of Emily Dickinson.
Jennifer Scott is the Member Services Officer for the Faculty Association of Simon Fraser University where she is also a Visiting Research Fellow in the Department of English. Her most recent publications are forthcoming in Victorian Periodicals Review and The Edinburgh Biographical Dictionary. Her previous work has been featured in Nineteenth Century Contexts, Victorian Periodicals Review, the Journal of Victorian Culture, and Studies in Canadian Literature.
Mohammad Sharifi did his Bachelors and Master’s in English Language and Literature at the University of Tehran. He is a PhD candidate at Western University. His PhD project deals with “schizophrenic grotesque,” narrative, and bodies in the works of William Burroughs, David Foster Wallace, and Bret Easton Ellis.
Sheheryar B. Sheikh is Lecturer, TSDF Fellow, and PhD candidate researching apocalyptic narratives at the University of Saskatchewan. His debut novel, The Still Point of the Turning World, was published to acclaim by HarperCollins India in 2017. Sheheryar has an MFA from the University of Notre Dame.
Michael O’Driscoll, Vice Dean of Arts and Professor in EFS at U of A, specializes in deconstruction, psychoanalysis, and 20th century US poetry and poetics. Mark Simpson, Professor in EFS at U of A, specializes in petrocultures and mobility theory. Both have long editorial involvement with ESC.
Mallory E. Land Smith is an English and Creative Writing PhD candidate working on Manifest Meaning, which she is writing, letterpress printing, and binding at the University of Calgary. Her thesis poetry collection that looks at dismantling notions of scientific objectivity through a consideration of materiality and the works of 17th century philosopher and writer Margaret Cavendish.
Shannon Smyrl and Mark Wallin work in the department of Journalism, Communication and New Media at Thompson Rivers University. Shannon explores cultural narratives of identity and community as they emerge from our engagements with technology. Mark writes on the work of Hayao Miyazaki and adaptation theory.
Edith Snook is Professor of English at the University of New Brunswick (Fredericton). She is the author of two books on early modern women’s writing and the editor of The Cultural History of Hair in the Renaissance (2018). Her current project is the Early Modern Maritime Recipes database.
Megan is a second year PhD student at the University of Saskatchewan. She specializes in interwar British and Irish literature, and her doctoral research focuses on the marginalization of women artists in the modernist works of Katherine Mansfield, Dorothy L. Sayers, and Jean Rhys.
Alyce Soulodre is pursuing a PhD in English Literature at Queen’s University. Her research interests include popular fiction of the long nineteenth-century, particularly Gothic and horror novels, with a focus on their depictions of villainous women and monstrous bodies.
Kate Stanley is Associate Professor at Western University. She is the author of Practices of Surprise in American Literature After Emerson (Cambridge UP 2018). Her contributions to the study of American literature, literary modernism, and pragmatism have appeared in American Literary History, Modernism/modernity, Criticism, and Henry James Review.
Natalie Anne Steenbergh is a graduate student in the literature program at Eastern Michigan University. At EMU, she is the editorial assistant for the Journal of Narrative Theory. She completed her undergraduate education in English at Wayne State University. Her research interests include historical representations of gender and sexuality.
Craig Stensrud is a PhD Candidate and instructor in the Department of English at UBC. He is currently completing his dissertation on hypocrisy and irony in antebellum American fiction. His most recent conference presentations have focused on the rhetoric and politics of irony in African-American abolitionist writings.
Nora Foster Stovel is Professor Emerita at the University of Alberta. She has published on Jane Austen, D.H. Lawrence, Margaret Drabble, Margaret Laurence, and Carol Shields. She is composing monographs on Carol Shields and nineteenth-century ballet, while preparing editions of Margaret Laurence’s essays and Carol Shields’s poetry.
Cecilia Stuart is a graduate student at the University of Toronto. Her research interests include the role of language in theory and literature about the environment and the generative possibilities of failure for feminist and ecocritical projects.
Thomas Stuart is a PhD candidate at Western University where his scholarship focuses on queer temporality, affect theory, and nineteenth century British and American genre fiction.
Cynthia Sugars is Professor of English at the University of Ottawa. She is the author of *Canadian Gothic: Literature, History, and the Spectre of Self-Invention*, and the editor of numerous books, including *Unsettled Remains: Canadian Literature and the Postcolonial Gothic*. She is the editor of *Studies in Canadian Literature*.
Mehnaz Tabassum is doing her MA in English at UBC Okanagan. She is a former Fulbright exchange scholar and a lecturer in English in Bangladesh. She examines the South Asian characters and representations in popular movies and cinemas. She has presented papers in international conferences and written columns for newspapers.
Joey Takeda is an MA student in the Department of English at UBC. His research focuses on Indigenous and diasporic literature written in Canada, critical and cultural theory, media studies, and the digital humanities.
Nicholas Tan is a PhD student in the Department of English at Simon Fraser University. His research involves contemporary political poetry’s intersections and overlaps with very recent social movements (Occupy, Black Lives Matter, Idle No More, etc.).
Ben Lee Taylor is a PhD candidate in the Department of English at York University. His dissertation project, entitled “The Social Production of Modernist Satire: Djuna Barnes, Wyndham Lewis, and Virginia Woolf,” analyzes how satire becomes differently and performatively gendered between the years 1914 and 1941.
Nathan TeBokkel is a PhD candidate at UBC, where he studies farmer-poets from Robbie Burns to Gary Soto. Drawing on his work in the genetics lab and melon field, he examines the intersections of aesthetics and agriculture.
Jorji (George) Temple is a PhD student on the Unceded Territories of the xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam), Səl̓ílwətaʔ/Selilwitulh (Tsleil-Waututh), kʷikʷəƛ̓əm (Kwitwetlem), and Skwxwú7mesh Úxwumixw (Squamish) peoples. They study at Simon Fraser University (named for a canoe thief), focusing on the relationship between neoliberalism and contemporary cultural representations of love.
Sandra Tomc is Professor of English at the University of British Columbia. She is the author of Industry and the Creative Mind: The Eccentric Writer in American Literature and Entertainment, 1790-1860 (2012). Her recent articles appear in ELH, American Literature and the Oxford Handbook of Edgar Allan Poe.
Jesyka Traynor is a PhD student at Queen’s University. She completed her master’s at Queen’s University, and her Bachelor of Arts at Western University. Her research focuses on Californian authors and their figuring of Californian spaces. Her dissertation will look at the works of John Steinbeck and Joan Didion.
Trimble is a pop culture scholar who teaches at the University of Toronto’s Women and Gender Studies Institute. Their book, Undead Ends: Stories of Apocalypse, will be published in May 2019 by Rutgers University Press.
Mario Trono is a researcher in Film Studies and the Environmental Humanities. He is co-editor of On Active Grounds: Agency and Time in the Environmental Humanities and Found in Alberta: Environmental Themes for the Anthropocene. His essay “A Better Distribution Deal: Ecocinematic Viewing and Montagist Reply” appears in the former.
Benedick Turner is Associate Professor of English at St. Joseph’s College, New York. He teaches medieval and 19th-century British literature, and his current research focus is on gender and work in Victorian literature, especially Tennyson’s Idylls of the King and Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes stories.
Carolyn Veldstra recently completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Alberta in affiliation with the Petrocultures Research Group. Her work has been published in English Studies in Canada, Comedy Studies, and JAC and is forthcoming in Cultural Studies. She is an Associate Editor with Reviews in Cultural Theory.
Vikki Visvis is a lecturer for the Department of English at the University of Toronto, where she teaches Canadian literature. She specializes in trauma theory and sound studies, and has published on Canadian and American fiction by Elizabeth Hay, Kerri Sakamoto, Dionne Brand, Eden Robinson, Joseph Boyden, Michael Ondaatje, David Bergen, and Toni Morrison in Canadian Literature, Mosaic, Studies in Canadian Literature, ARIEL, and African American Review.
Leah Wafler is currently a graduate student in English at University of British Columbia Okanagan. Her research interests include representations of animals in literature, nonhuman animal agency, and exploring divergent ways of relating to the nonhuman world.
Sarah R. Wallace is pursuing a Master’s in English and Creative Writing at the University of New Brunswick. Her research interests include Modernism, animal studies, and philosophy of aesthetics. Her poetry has been published in The University of Edinburgh Journal and at The Plath Poetry Project.
Maggie Ward is a first-year PhD student at McMaster University. Her research focuses on settler-colonialism and Indigenous literature.
Paul Watkins is Assistant Professor of English at Vancouver Island University and a researcher with the International Institute for Critical Studies in Improvisation. He has published numerous book and film reviews and interviews with writers, as well as peer-reviewed articles on multiculturalism, Canadian poetry, jazz, and hip-hop. At Vancouver Island University, he is the Artistic Director of the “Writers on Campus” series.
I am a philosopher and I work in the area of children’s literature and philosophy.
Willow White is a PhD candidate in the Department of English at McGill University where she holds the SSHRC CGS Doctoral Scholarship. Her dissertation examines comic women playwrights of the 18th-century. Willow is a proud member of the Métis Nation of Alberta.
Christina Wiendels is a third-year PhD candidate in early modern studies at McMaster University. Her dissertation, tentatively titled “To Make and to Mirror: God and Humanity in John Milton’s Paradise Lost,” observes the human being as an indispensable entry point for discussion of Milton’s poem. Her email is wiendelc@mcmaster.ca.
Julianna Will is a fourth year Ph.D. candidate who specializes in Ancient Greek and Victorian literature. She completed her MA in classics at Queen’s University, focusing on Euripidean fragment tragedy, with her thesis “Euripides’s Antiope and the Theban Trilogy.” This paper is part of her larger doctoral dissertation project, which focuses on the reception of Euripides in the 19th century, entitled “The Horror and the Glory: Euripides Among the Victorians.”
Dr. Heather Cyr is a faculty member in the English Department at Kwantlen Polytechnic University. She is co-creator and co-runner of the First-Year English Labs. Jennifer Williams is a faculty member in the English Department at Kwantlen Polytechnic University. She is co-creator and co-runner of the First-Year English Labs.
Rachel Windsor is a Master’s student at Western University. Her work focuses on twenty-first century American literature, with a particular emphasis on trauma, testimony, and the archive.
Caroline Winter is a PhD Candidate in the English Department at the University of Victoria in British Columbia, where she studies British Romantic literature, book history, women’s writing, and digital humanities. Her dissertation examines how Romantic Gothic literature interacts with its economic contexts.
Caroline Winter is a PhD Candidate in the English department at the University of Victoria, where she studies British Romantic literature. Her areas of interest are Gothic literature, literature and economics, women’s writing, and digital humanities.
Rachel Wong is a doctoral student in the English department at York University, Toronto. She holds an MA in Comparative Literature from Western University and a BA in English and History from Simon Fraser University. She researches the intersections of the Chinese Canadian diaspora, activist work, and Asian Canadian literature.
Julia M. Wright, FRSC, is University Research Professor and Professor of English at Dalhousie University. She is the author of four monographs, most recently Men with Stakes: Masculinity and the Gothic in US Television and Representing the National Landscape in Irish Romanticism. She is also the editor or co-editor of a further eleven volumes.
Kailin Wright is an Associate Professor at St. Francis Xavier University. Her work includes Carroll Aikins’s The God of Gods (2016) and articles in Theatre Journal, Canadian Literature, Studies in Canadian Literature, Theatre Research in Canada, Making Canada New, and more. Her SSHRC-funded project focuses on pregnancy in Canadian theatre.
Skylet is an MA student in the Department of English Language and Literatures at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver. She holds a BA in English Language and a TESL Diploma. Her research interests include corpus linguistics, cognitive linguistics, language change, language assessment, English varieties, and Canadianisms.
Robert Zacharias is Assistant Professor in the English Department at York University in Toronto. His research interests include Canadian literature and Mennonite writing, and his recent publications include essays on the politics of space in Canadian literary criticism, the globality of early Canadian writing, and the function of the “Mennonite Thing” in contemporary criticism.
Jack Zapotochny is a Ph.D. student of English at York University studying Restoration and 18th-Century Literature. He is working towards a dissertation on the writings of English MPs from 1750 to 1800, examining the literary resonance of the 18th-Century political landscape. His interests include satire, rhetoric, and print culture.