Member-Organized Panel CFPs

ACCUTE 2019

The following CFPs are for panels organized by members of ACCUTE.

Note: You must be an ACCUTE member in good standing to present on a Member-Organized Panel.  The member organizer will forward any rejected proposals that are not ideally suited to the panel for inclusion in the General Pool.

Please see our FAQs for more information or email us.

Deadline for all paper proposals:

November 15, 2018

New this year:

All submissions for ACCUTE should be made online through the ACCUTE Proposal Submission Form

To view a CFP, click on the panel name below, or click here to jump down to the full list of panels.

Accessibility in the English Classroom

Bad Deleuze! Bad Lacan!

Bullshit Academic Jobs (Round Table)

Call and Response-ability: Black Art and the Politics of Relation

Choose Your Own Adventure: The Impact of Video Game Branching on Narrative Theory

Consumption and the Literary Cookbook

The Creative Humanities

New Monstrosities: New Approaches to 19th-Century Monsters

Presentist, Historical, and Unveiled Identities from Beowulf to the 18th Century

Reconsidering Mentorship (Round Table)

Subversive Intimacies, Unsettling Encounters

Topographies of Interiority: Medieval Representation (NEW!)

Accessibility in the English Classroom

Organizer(s): Ann Gagné (Durham College)

This panel will highlight best practices for maintaining accessibility in English literature, English composition, or English language learner classes. Papers or presentations can discuss apps that help support access or classroom policies and procedures that ensure access in terms of curriculum or the classroom environment (classroom architecture). How do we incorporate Universal Design for Learning in our classes to promote multiple modes of representation of material? This panel also welcomes discussion of assessment strategies used in English classrooms that are accessible and encourage Indigenous ways of knowing, racial equity, and expression of gender, or sexual orientation.  Discussion can centre on specific uses of learning management systems for accessibility, digital humanities and access, fonts, presentations, open educational resources and economic access, or any other aspect of accessibility.

Please submit by 15 November 2018 through the ACCUTE Proposal Submission Form.

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Bad Deleuze! Bad Lacan!

Organizer(s): Ryan Fitzpatrick (University of Toronto, Scarborough) and Deanna Fong (Simon Fraser University)

This panel asks presenters to interrogate their approaches to theory in literary study. How do we negotiate the relation (or non-relation) between these two seemingly separate fields? Rather than propose a vulgar metaphor where the theoretical text becomes a methodological appliqué, can we pose theory as a stance instead of a structuring framework? What are the limits of an orthodox theoretical approach and what does it mean to be, in Roxane Gay’s sense, a “bad” adherent to a theoretical discourse—doubling back upon one’s convictions, probing inconsistency, refusing to resolve contradiction? Finally, we ask: what does it mean to organize thought through the framework of theory, particularly continental theory, in the face of resurgent critiques of citational politics from feminist and BIPOC scholars that challenge the notion of a unified theoretical canon?

Possible topics include:

  • Theoretical fidelity and infidelity
  • Theoretical counterpoints (Lacan vs Deleuze, etc.)
  • The social history of theory
  • Theory’s fraught relationship to race and Indigeneity
  • The refusal of theory or the refusal of certain kindsof theory
  • Literature as theory / theory as literature
  • Application of theory vs. theory as method vs. theory as stance vs. theory as conversation

Please submit by 15 November 2018 through the ACCUTE Proposal Submission Form.

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Bullshit Academic Jobs (Round Table)

Organizer(s): Geordie Miller (Mount Allison and Dalhousie) and Leif Schenstead-Harris (Concordia)

Let’s be frank. The job ‘market’ for English PhDs is bullshit—a chimera denying the reality of labour crisis. Our roundtable pursues a grievous question: are the jobs behind the teaching and research of literature also bullshit? We pose this question in the spirit of a popular 2013 essay by anthropologist David Graeber, “On the Phenomenon of Bullshit Jobs.” This essay resonates with the overworked, underemployed, and demoralized among us, i.e., the growing contingent of disposable teachers and researchers. Graeber’s subsequent 2018 book Bullshit Jobsdevelops a general hypothesis: those who are paid more have increasingly more pointless jobs, and those whose jobs are recognized as useful are paid less—if their work is remunerated at all.

From the perspective of English studies, what visions of non-bullshit labour are possible? What can we make of our ongoing relationships with each other, our research, our students, our mentors, and our institutions? What does it mean to admit that bullshit jobs have consumed not only the work of others, but also, the work that we too perform?

We are seeking brief interventions, followed by discussions on topics that may include:

  • auto-ethnographic reflections on “bullshit jobs”
  • theorizations of the line between “bullshit jobs,” “shit jobs,” and meaningful work
  • representations of pointless labour and their relationship to the labour market and economic crisis
  • discussions of the relative pointlessness and value of temporary or tenured labour
  • commentaries on the merits and challenges of the traditional academic researcher role

Please submit by 15 November 2018 through the ACCUTE Proposal Submission Form.

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Call and Response-ability: Black Art and the Politics of Relation

Organizer(s): Winfried Siemerling (University of Waterloo) and Karina Vernon (University of Toronto)

In Poetics of Relation, Édouard Glissant elaborates the political possibilities of black art: it opens up opportunities for connection, relation and exchange that can potentially transform colonial and capitalist modes of rendering humans into nonhumans and land into property. In thinking about processes of reading, teaching, and responding to black art on Turtle Island in various institutional and non-institutional sites, questions arise about how this potential for relation implicates audience members. How does black art call upon its audiences to act, relate, identify, empathize and become responsible – to history, to relating – and to what effect?

We welcome papers that focus on black art and its audiences—both historical and contemporary – including, literature, visual art, music and film, and which consider especially:

  • Black art in pedagogy, the classroom, the book club, or Canada Reads
  • Black art and activism, including #BlackLivesMatter and #IdleNoMore
  • Black-Indigenous identities, histories, relations, decolonial solidarities, affective bonds and kinship ties
  • Black love, relationships and futures
  • Gendered and queer relations
  • Black art and anticapitalism
  • Black art and the Anthropocene; land, air, and water protection; other-than human relations

Please submit by 15 November 2018 through the ACCUTE Proposal Submission Form.

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Choose Your Own Adventure: The Impact of Video Game Branching on Narrative Theory

Organizer(s): Nora Foster Stovel (University of Alberta)

Proposals are invited on the impact of video game branching on narrative theory in any or all the sister arts, including literature, drama, film, and dance. The panel will be followed by a brief demonstration of the video game prototype iGiselle. Inspired by the Romantic 1841 ballet Giselle, wherein the eponymous peasant heroine dies and is survived by her deceitful aristocratic suitor, this video game employs an artificial intelligence experience manager that allows players to select alternative fates for Giselle, such as keeping her alive and allowing her agency, by performing ballet poses before a Microsoft Kinect sensor.

The development of iGiselle, the first video game based on ballet, is chronicled in the book to be launched following the panel: The Creation of iGiselle: Classical Ballet Meets Contemporary Video Games(2019). This collection of essays, by members of the interdisciplinary team that created the video game prototype, explains the origin and development of this collaborative project.

Please submit by 15 November 2018 through the ACCUTE Proposal Submission Form.

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Consumption and the Literary Cookbook

Organizer(s): Roxanne Harde (University of Alberta)

The literary cookbook genre includes cookbooks based on authors and/or their writing, such as The Bloomsbury Cookbookor Alice Eats: A Wonderland Cookbook. Widely configured, it can also include novels or memoirs laden with recipes, such as Like Water for Chocolateor Miriam’s Kitchen. And sometime seemingly straightforward cookbooks turn out to be literary epics, like the work of Lolis Eric Elie or Anthony Bourdain. Whatever its final form, the literary cookbook centres on consumption, and the question of what (or sometimes who) is consumed makes these books as interesting as they are useful. This panel will be comprised of 3 to 4 papers that analyse consumption in this loosely defined, but sumptuous, genre.

Please submit by 15 November 2018 through the ACCUTE Proposal Submission Form.

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The Creative Humanities

Organizer(s): Brandon McFarlane (Sheridan College)

The creative economy is transforming the role of post-secondary institutions in Canada. The creative economy describes how innovation—the design of new products and services—now fuels GDP growth in advance-capitalist nations. Seeking to better position Canada for prosperity, governments have revamped their educational and research policy; post-secondary institutions are being compelled to underwrite economic growth by training workers for the creative industries and reimagining research outputs. These shifts contextualize the latest ‘crisis of the humanities’: declining enrolment, shuttering of programs, challenging job markets for graduates, and increasing competition among programs for scarce resources. Rather than approaching these broad changes as a crisis, this panel asks, how might the humanities take advantage of the opportunities opened up by the creative economy?

This CFP especially welcomes proposals from humanists—anyone with training in the humanities—who are interested in contributing to an ambitious project that will apply for a SSHRC Insight grant to nurture creative talent and produce infrastructure to build pathways for post-graduate success. If you are motivated to pursue experimentation and are driven to help graduates enjoy rewarding careers, please do submit a proposal. Your innovations will determine the long-term viability of the humanities.

Please submit by 15 November 2018 through the ACCUTE Proposal Submission Form.

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New Monstrosities: New Approaches to 19th-Century Monsters

Organizer(s): Alicia Alves (Queen’s) and Lindsay Young (Queen’s)

From Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein to Bram Stoker’s Dracula, the nineteenth century is bursting with visions of the monstrous. Monsters lurked in hidden spaces of cities, in art and illustration, and in the pages of fiction and journalism. The nineteenth century conceived of monstrosity in bodily form, but also interpreted various practices as monstrous in and of themselves, such as perceived moral degeneracy or non-normative sexualities. This panel seeks papers that offer fresh critical perspectives on monstrosities in various forms throughout the nineteenth century.

Possible paper topics might include:

  • Queer, feminist, anti-colonialist perspectives on fear and/or monsters
  • Domestic/anti-domestic monsters; places of haunting/terror
  • Neo-Romantic, Neo-Gothic or Neo-Victorian monsters and fear
  • Titillation and terror in pulp genres, including science fiction, fantasy, crime fiction and/or penny dreadfuls
  • Representations of classic monsters such as vampires, werewolves, or ghosts, versus more pervasive social ‘monsters,’ such as rakes, degenerates, libertines, etc.
  • Modes of the supernatural, magic, and ‘unnatural’ power
  • Representations of monsters in art, advertisements, photography, or other visual mediums
  • Representations of technology, industry, or innovation as consciously/unconsciously monstrous

Please submit by 15 November 2018 through the ACCUTE Proposal Submission Form.

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Presentist, Historical, and Unveiled Identities from Beowulf to the 18th Century

Organizer(s): Mark Kaethler (Medicine Hat College)

This survey panel aims to establish dialogues between experts in early literatures. The confluence of epochs facilitates cross-historical discussion and provides a means for thinking about ways to teach early survey courses in university or college classrooms.

This panel focuses on identities (racial, gendered, sexual, or mediatized, etc.). In recent years, scholars have labelled efforts to locate early forms of contemporary identity in early literature as presentist, an approach that tends to overlook differences between historical eras by prioritizing current concerns. However, are presentist methods actually flawed? And does any effort to trace earlier forms of current interests automatically constitute presentism? The panel preoccupies itself with presentism and historicism but offers a third category to think through a middle ground between these two approaches: unveiling. If we are only now comprehending a previously neglected aspect of identity politics, then does that mean that we are also only now recognizing its presence (rather than presentism) in earlier centuries?

Panelists are invited to explore these questions in poetry, prose, or drama from the Anglo-Saxon period to the eighteenth century and to integrate praxis-based experiences and/or methods of teaching these findings in the classroom.

Please submit by 15 November 2018 through the ACCUTE Proposal Submission Form.

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Reconsidering Mentorship (Round Table)

Organizer(s): Brenna Clarke Gray (Douglas College)

The current post-secondary environment in English studies shows many fault lines in the discipline, not least a failure of understanding of the role of the mentor within our institutions. We are seeking pairs of mentors and mentees interested in an open-format roundtable discussion of how mentorship works, how you know you’re getting it right, and what can happen when it goes wrong, with contributions from both sides of the mentor/ee relationship. Participants are asked to submit a brief statement of interest outlining the mentorship relationship from both perspectives. Questions for the roundtable will be circulated to participants in advance of Congress 2019.

Please submit by 15 November 2018 through the ACCUTE Proposal Submission Form.

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Subversive Intimacies, Unsettling Encounters

Organizer(s): Sarah Kent (Queen’s)

“Intimacy” is an intensely ambiguous word that gestures to some kind of togetherness; it is an affinity that may indicate physical proximity, sexual activity, or emotional familiarity between people, place, other-than-human kin, or in/tangible things. This panel seeks to assess the potential of unexpected intimacies to unsettle, exceed, or subvert hegemonic structures. Expansively defined to gather a range of perspectives and theoretical frameworks, intimacy may occur at the micro or macro levels. This panel asks, (how) can intimate encounters with ourselves or one another refigure the familiar ordering of the world? Participants may also trouble the idea of intimacy as a counter-politics, examine intimacies that are toxic to personal, collective, or environmental wellbeing, or consider how intimacy may always be mediated.

Discussions may include, but are not limited to, the following areas of exploration:

  • Queer, Critical Race, Disability, Gender and Feminist frameworks
  • Indigenous, postcolonial, or anti-colonial perspectives
  • Ecocriticism and environmental studies
  • Animal Studies/Animality Studies
  • Affect theory and embodied knowledge
  • Coalition-building and social justice movements
  • Thing theory and intimacies with objects
  • The transformation of intimacies over time or in various periods
  • Representations of intimacy in genre fiction, including sci-fi, fantasy, romance, or horror

 

Please submit by 15 November 2018 through the ACCUTE Proposal Submission Form.

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Topographies of Interiority: Medieval Representation (New!)

Organizer(s): Richard Angelo Bergen (UBC)

Calling for papers on topological representations of interiority in medieval literature. Since the “spatial turn” in the humanities and social sciences, the novel and modern incarnations of the lyric poem have been the focal texts of spatial approaches. Medieval representations of space and place present a challenge of alterity since as they do not confirm modern expectations of isometry, mimesis, or “accurate” mapping. Nevertheless, the pre-cartographic imagination of medieval cultures is not simplistic or monolithic, but present the modern reader with a different series of preoccupations and configurations. These preoccupations are enveloped in the diction of the soul and passions, but necessitate a two-way confluence and construction of the exterior world.

Some topics might include:

  • The employment or negation of place/space in the writings associated with mysticism
  • The division of “the world” as an enemy of the soul, with “nature,” “creation,” or “the universe” as redeemable and/or distinct(?) categories
  • The topologies of love and/or grief
  • Spatial mnemonics and Memoria
  • Dreamscapes
  • Humoral influence in different spaces
  • Medieval Maps/mapping and cosmological analogy
  • Pilgrimage, exploration and interior resonances

Please submit by 15 November 2018 through the ACCUTE Proposal Submission Form.

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