Member-Organized Panel CFPs

ACCUTE 2020

**Please note: The deadline for proposals has now passed. Please check back later for updates on the ACCUTE 2020 conference.**

The following CFPs are for panels organized by members of ACCUTE.

Note: You must be an ACCUTE member in good standing to present on a Member-Organized Panel.  The member organizer will forward any rejected proposals that are not ideally suited to the panel for inclusion in the General Pool.

Please see our FAQs for more information or email us.

Deadline for all paper proposals:

November 15, 2019

All submissions for ACCUTE should be made online through the ACCUTE Proposal Submission Form

To view a CFP, click on the panel name below, or click here to jump down to the full list of panels.

Alice Munro and the Archive

Building Community in the Post-Secondary Classroom (Teaching Demonstration)

Canadian Literature in/as Crisis

The Classroom as Ecology and the Ecological Classroom (Roundtable)

A Community of Outcasts in the Works of Emma Donoghue

Critical University Studies Today (Roundtable)

Decolonizing Education (Storytelling Panel)

DIY and Experimental Approaches to Knowledge Mobilization (Roundtable Workshop)

EdTech and the English Classroom (Roundtable)

Experiential Learning and English Majors

Fangs, Claws, and Pariahs: Victorians vs. the Creature

The Feminist (Affective) Archive: Present and Future (Roundtable)

Follow the Money!

Lacan Now

Practices of Listening: Solidarity, Anti-Racism, and Difference in the Academy (Roundtable)

Queers Who Care: Disrupting the Libertarian Impulse in Queer Theory

Reading Modernist Pain

Shame: Reconfiguring a Disciplinary Tool (Roundtable)

Textual Be/longing in Contemporary Canadian Literatures

This Book is Trash!: Genres and Forms of Disposability, Ephemerality, and Disintegration

What’s the Value of Interdisciplinary Research in the Humanities? (Roundtable)

Alice Munro and the Archive

Organizer(s): Jason Wiens (Calgary)

The Alice Munro papers at the University of Calgary are a widely-used resource in Munro scholarship. A team of researchers at Calgary, for example, have been working to visualize parts of the archive through aggregating data from drafts of Munro’s stories as well as encoding some stories through the protocols of the Text Encoding Initiative. At the same time, the archive and its relationship to memory are recurring themes in Munro’s writing, in stories such as “Meneseteung,” for example. With the Congress of the Social Sciences and Humanities taking place at Western University, near Huron County which Munro’s fiction has so memorably chronicled, we feel this is an appropriate venue to discuss Munro’s archive and the significance of the archive in her fiction. Papers may consider such topics as:

  • genetic critical approaches to Munro’s writing
  • ethics and the archives of living writers
  • new archival approaches
  • history, memory, and the archive in Munro’s fiction
  • sound archives and Munro
  • born-digital archives and Munro
  • digitizing / visualizing the archive
  • public vs. private archives
  • literary correspondence
  • Munro’s relationship with commercial publishers and magazines

Please submit by 15 November 2019 through the ACCUTE Proposal Submission Form.

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Building Community in the Post-Secondary Classroom (Teaching Demonstration)

Organizer(s): Elizabeth McIntosh (Durham College)

Even though post-secondary populations are becoming more diverse, cultivating community in the classroom is a strength of the humanities. What types of readings, assignments, exercises, discussions, or activities do you use in your classes to effectively build positive relationships between students and/or faculty?

In a 10-minute teaching demonstration followed by discussion, outline what you’ve implemented and/or witnessed to be an effective way to establish, build, or improve relationships in the classroom. Presentation content may include coursework, steps taken in response to an issue, or a grounding exercise to anticipate and address common barriers to establishing community.

Please submit by 15 November 2019 through the ACCUTE Proposal Submission Form.

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Canadian Literature in/as Crisis

Organizer(s): Ryan Fitzpatrick (University of Toronto, Scarborough)

It seems as if we are in a moment of perpetual crisis from the environmental to the economic to the national to the literary.  Overcoming crisis involves righting the ship to return stability, but the dynamic between crisis and its overcoming can also stabilize current power structures. Crisis is the word used repeatedly by the commissioners of the inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls in the prefatory materials to their final report. Chief Commissioner Marion Butler announces that “[a]s a nation, we face a crisis” (7). Canada’s declaration of an acute, evental crisis belies the ways that Indigenous peoples have faced the crisis of Canada for hundreds of years. In other words, what if, following Patrick Wolfe, we read crisis as structural rather than evental – not an exception, but an ongoing dynamic operating unevenly across our shared spaces?

This panel asks how literature in Canada negotiates, conceptualizes, and challenges crisis. Often framed using the same language as crisis, literary texts can tear our collective subjects apart and bring them together, offer new possibilities or lines of flight, create powerful solidarities or harden shared logics against those solidarities. How do we think about literature as it responds to crisis and, more pointedly, as it is reproductive of larger structural crises? 

Please submit by 15 November 2019 through the ACCUTE Proposal Submission Form.

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The Classroom as Ecology and the Ecological Classroom (Roundtable)

Organizer(s): Madeline Bassnett (Western)

This roundtable invites micro-papers (5-7 minutes long) that examine how ecological pedagogies might include university spaces as well as literature and creative writing classrooms in thinking about the environment. How seriously do we take the distinction between form and content when it comes to the physical classroom? What symbolic and material roles does the classroom take on when we teach environmental substance and matter? To what extent does the experience of teaching and learning literature/creative writing require us to sit still in traditional classrooms? As climate change shapes our ecological focus, how do we understand, teach, and experience the equally important classroom ecologies of gender and sexuality, race, class, and ability? 

Explorations may include but are not limited to:

  • classroom space and literary form
  • experiential learning
  • ecological intersectionalities
  • accessibility and the campus environment
  • creative writing and the classroom space
  • ecological activism and the classroom
  • cross-disciplinary ecologies
  • Indigenous ways of knowing and the classroom
  • oralities and story-worlds as alternative pedagogies

Please submit by 15 November 2019 through the ACCUTE Proposal Submission Form.

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A Community of Outcasts in the Works of Emma Donoghue

Organizer(s): Vicky Simpson (University of New Brunswick)

Donoghue, an Irish-Canadian playwright, literary historian, novelist, and screenwriter, has been publishing for over 25 years.  She is best known for her contemporary novel Room(2010), which was shortlisted for the Man Booker and Orange prizes and was adapted into an Oscar-nominated feature film. Donoghue has also written a number of historical novels, including Slammerkin(2000), Life Mask (2004), The Sealed Letter (2008), and The Wonder (2016), as well as several short story collections, plays, works of literary history, and a series for middle-grade readers.  

In a recent interview, Donoghue describes an impulse “to represent the ones who had been left out—like the nobodies, women, slaves, people in freak shows, servants—the ones who are not powerful.”[1] This panel invites papers that engage in any way with this community of outcasts, or the concept of the outcast, in Donoghue’s work.

Possible paper topics include:

  • Generic outcasts: hybridity, the historical or biographical novel, revisionist fairy tales
  • The suffering of the outcast: observation and captivity, trauma narratives, victim/perpetrator binaries
  • Relations with the outcast: domesticity, desire, friendship, marriage, motherhood, divorce, generational tension
  • Accepting the outcast: acts of mutual exchange, such as storytelling, mentorship, and love
  • Identifying as an outcast: queer histories, cultures, and characters; female sexualities; physical bodies 
  • Places and spaces of outcasts: borderlands, rural Ireland, cosmopolitan London
  • Comparative studies with other writers, i.e. Jeanette Winterson, Ali Smith, Sarah Waters
  • Applications of new critical models (e.g. affect theory, the posthuman, ecocriticism, gender studies, memory, trauma, and age studies) to Donoghue’s work

[1]Lackey, Michael and Emma Donoghue. “Emma Donoghue: Voicing the Nobodies in the Biographical Novel.” Éire-Ireland 53.1 (2018): 120-133.

Please submit by 15 November 2019 through the ACCUTE Proposal Submission Form.

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Critical University Studies Today (Roundtable)

Organizer(s): Ian Butcher (Fanshawe College)

This roundtable asks participants to provide 5 minute introductions to their work in/about Critical University Studies (CUS) to inspire discussion on both its current streams and its potential shortcomings. Approaching ten years since Jeffrey J. Williams defined the field in the Chronicle of Higher Education, it is time to begin evaluating how successfully CUS has grown beyond its initial foci and participants. While many of its concerns remain relevant—that higher education should be freely available to all, or that adjunctification must be fought through organization and unionization, for example—how responsive has it been to calls to diversify its voices and concerns? Is there a need to decolonize critical university studies as its canon has solidified around primarily white male academics? What lessons must CUS be aware of from predecessors like Critical Legal Studies and from fields like Indigenous Studies, Black Studies, and Women’s and Gender Studies to allow its scholarly work to resonate with groups working for and promoting equality in and outside of academe? Of particular interest are applications of CUS questions and methods to underexplored topics like campus bookstores/course book orders, connections to the #RealCollege movement, and non-US perspectives and concerns.

Please submit by 15 November 2019 through the ACCUTE Proposal Submission Form.

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Decolonizing Education (Storytelling Panel)

Organizer(s): Alicia Fahey (Emily Carr University of Art + Design)

What does decolonization do? What are we doing when we use the language of decolonization?[1] This panel aims to generate meaningful discussion and produce concrete examples about dismantling Western knowledge systems in order to move towards reconciliation and Indigenous self-governance in the contexts of post-secondary education in Canada. Participants in this panel will deliver presentations in the form of storytelling. Storytelling encompasses many forms of narrative including song, dance, oral stories and symbolic representations. Possible topics include stories about:

  • the TRC ninety-four calls to action, the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, the Final Report of the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls 
  • Indigenous protocols and/or consultation
  • land as pedagogy
  • being called out or “called in” (Ngọc Loan Trần)
  • decolonizing strategies, definitions, methodologies, critiques
  • disrupting the “perfect stranger” (Susan D. Dion)
  • relationships, family, community-building, collaboration, alliances
  • stewardship of Indigenous education
  • learning from students
  • creating culturally supportive frameworks

[1]I take my cue here from Sara Ahmed, who asks these questions about diversity, (rather than decolonization), in her book On Being Included (2012).

Please submit by 15 November 2019 through the ACCUTE Proposal Submission Form.

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DIY and Experimental Approaches to Knowledge Mobilization (Roundtable Workshop)

Organizer(s): Hannah McGregor and Lucia Lorenzi (Simon Fraser University)

With increasing pressure from funding bodies and institutions to mobilize our research in publicly accessible ways, humanities scholars are faced with a challenging question: who is our research really for, and how do we meaningfully engage diverse audiences at all stages of our research process? For some, knowledge mobilization is relegated to the final stages of a project, after the knowledge has been produced. But for many scholars, including Black and Indigenous scholars, community accountability has always been a fundamental priority of knowledge production, highlighting the ways in which public scholarly engagement is informed by deeply political and ethical sets of relations. Even when public engagement is a priority, finding the best ways to engage your publics can be challenging, expensive, and time-consuming. However, the world of DIY and grass-roots publishing has much to teach us, from blogs and social media to podcasts and zines. In this workshop, panelists will share their experiments in knowledge mobilization, and then will work with attendees to devise plans for their own ongoing research projects. Together we’ll explore knowledge mobilization not as a neoliberal demand of granting agencies or an over-simplification of complex research, but as a joyous and creative means of sharing work you’re passionate about.

The session will be divided into two parts: panelists will provide a brief (3-minute) summary of their work, after which they will share practical skills with attendees/participants.

Roundtable applicants should submit a 250-word description of their proposed presentation. Workshop participants need not apply in advance, but are welcome to send particular questions or concerns they’re interested in to the organizers.

Please submit by 15 November 2019 through the ACCUTE Proposal Submission Form.

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EdTech and the English Classroom (Roundtable)

Organizer(s): Brenna Clarke Gray (Thompson Rivers University)

In this roundtable session, participants are invited to share a technological innovation they have developed or adapted for their classroom context, and then to join in a larger discussion about how English studies and digital tools intersect. Questions to consider might include:

  • What assumptions do we make about English students and classrooms?
  • What institutional supports are needed to allow the robust adoption of digital tools?
  • Where are analogue tools still best practice, and why?
  • How has embracing digital tools in the classroom changed your scholarship?
  • What can you do in the classroom now that you couldn’t have imagined ten years ago?

Potential participants are asked to submit a 100-word description of the tool they wish to highlight and a 250-word intervention on any of the questions listed above (or another related topic).

Graduate students with teaching experience are strongly encouraged to submit.

Please submit by 15 November 2019 through the ACCUTE Proposal Submission Form.

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Experiential Learning and English Majors

Organizer(s): Joel Baetz (Trent)

Across Canada, universities are pushing for (and being pushed to offer) experiential learning opportunities for undergraduates. But the bulk of these experiential learning opportunities are aimed at STEM and business students. What are the best ways to think about experiential learning for English majors? 

This panel will offer an eclectic range of approaches to this issue. You might consider (but not limit yourself to) a paper on the following topics:

  • the impact of experiential learning on faculty (precarious and permanent);
  • the motivations for offering experiential learning to English majors;
  • the history and rhetoric of experiential learning in the context of literary studies;
  • the way experiential learning formulates the position of the (English) student;
  • the idea of transferable/translatable skills; and
  • the kinds of policies that best support experiential learning. 

Please submit by 15 November 2019 through the ACCUTE Proposal Submission Form.

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Fangs, Claws, and Pariahs: Victorians vs. the Creature

Organizer(s): Alicia Alves, Lindsay Young, and Alyce Soulodre (Queen’s)

From the natural world to the unnatural world, the Victorian imagination was filled with imagery of ‘the creature,’ be it scientific, fantastic, or other-ly. From butterfly collections lovingly labeled to terrifying bedtime stories of werewolves and vampires, from monstrously dehumanized or ‘creature-fied’ bodies to stories narrated by anthropomorphized animals, Victorians were expanding the limits of ‘creaturehood’ like never before. Between animals, insects, monsters, fantastical beings, and othered bodies, in what ways did Victorians embrace ‘creatures’ in their daily lives, while reviling them in others? This panel invites papers that consider many broad definitions of ‘creatures’ in Victorian literature, culture, art, and other mediums. 

Possible topics may include (but are not limited to): 

  • Collected creatures and animals, and their curators 
  • Exploration and ‘discovery’ of species 
  • Fantastical or nonhuman creatures such as vampires, werewolves, and supernatural monsters
  • Dehumanized or creaturely people  
  • Animalistic or creaturely attributes, or hybridity
  • Domesticated animals and their relationships to their keepers, whether child or adult 
  • Debates surrounding practices such as vivisection and meat consumption 
  • Representations of creatures in art, advertisements, photography, or other visual mediums
  • Neo-Victorian representations of the creature

Please submit by 15 November 2019 through the ACCUTE Proposal Submission Form.

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The Feminist (Affective) Archive: Present and Future (Roundtable)

Organizer(s): Julia Polyck-O’Neill (Brock)

Linda M. Morra argues, “It is not merely the content of archives that matters; the very shape they assume and the sociological epistemologies that undergird them must be properly apprehended” (12). Dorothy Kim describes the roles desire and emotional affect play in the creation of archives, and in the “political, national, and social forces often at play in creating them” (232). Michelle Caswell and Marika Cifor destabilize and denaturalize the idea of the neutrality of the archive when they position the archivist as caregiver, with “affective responsibilities” (36-38). Zoe Meng Jiang observes how intersubjective experiences between mothers and daughters enact a kind of “soft archive” (35). 

Archives have a long association with scholarship in literary studies, but approaches to and understandings of the archive have been undergoing social and cultural transformations. This panel invites participants to consider such topics as how feminist methodological, epistemological, and political changes have changed how “the archive” and archival studies are understood and/or used in literary research, and/or to discuss the use or creation of emerging or alternate archival forms or collections. 

Works Cited

Caswell, Michelle and Marika Cifor. “From Human Rights to Feminist Ethics: Radical Empathy in the Archives.” Archivariano. 81, Spring 2016, pp. 23-43.

Jiang, Zoe Meng. “Soft Archives: Motherhood and Daughterhood in Post-Socialist China.” Journal of Contemporary Chinese Art, no. 1, 2019, p. 35-55.

Kim, Dorothy. “Building Pleasure and the Digital Archive.” Bodies of Information: Intersectional Feminism and the Digital Humanities, edited by Elizabeth Losh and Jacqueline Wernimont. University of Minnesota Press, 2019, pp. 230-260.

Morra, Linda M. Unarrested Archives: Case Studies in Twentieth-Century Canadian Women’s Authorship. University of Toronto Press, 2014.

Please submit by 15 November 2019 through the ACCUTE Proposal Submission Form.

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Follow the Money!

Organizer(s): Mervyn Nicholson (Thompson Rivers University)

“Follow the money” is a phrase made famous by the movie All the President’s Men: it expresses the ultimate political wisdom promulgated by the oracular secret source known as “Deep Throat.”  That’s what this session is interested in—following the money.  Money as power, power as money.  Money scenes—buying, selling, counting money—physical money—but in general financial transactions.  Cui bono? Who wins? Who loses?  Money as hidden factor, as plot-device, as political statement.  Misers. Spendthrifts.  Money and sex.  Money shots. Money in the university—students and money—money as bribe.  Debt.  Money in academia.  Money as different in “old literature.”  Bubbles and Crashes.  Speculative swindles.  

Please submit by 15 November 2019 through the ACCUTE Proposal Submission Form.

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Lacan Now

Organizer(s): Concetta Principe (Trent)

In this panel, we invite paper proposals that consider how Jacques Lacan’s psychoanalytic method engages with scholarship today.  

Lacan avoided using psychoanalysis to interpret social or cultural phenomena, although he suspected his science would be effective. Social and cultural critics have proven Lacan’s suspicions correct. Althusser’s psychoanalytic exploration of ideology is one of the earliest examples of the effective application of psychoanalysis beyond the clinic. In the cultural field, Copjec and Žižek, among others, have applied psychoanalysis to interpreting film. Humanities scholars who fuse Freudian and Lacanian approaches, Caruth as an example, have attempted to apply psychoanalysis to consider the relationship between the Holocaust survivor’s trauma and the text. Considering how psychoanalysis and Lacan’s concepts have been applied across a variety of fields, we see a method that is flexible enough to remain current. What can Lacan contribute to transgender studies, disability studies, postcolonialism, critical race theory, affect theory, anxiety, alternative truths and the ethical subject, to name some fields and topics of research? Papers may want to consider this question from a strictly theoretical perspective or show that relationship by carrying out a psychoanalytic analysis of a critical text, movement, or event central to the field.   

Please submit by 15 November 2019 through the ACCUTE Proposal Submission Form.

Please submit by 15 November 2019 through the ACCUTE Proposal Submission Form.

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Practices of Listening: Solidarity, Anti-Racism, and Difference in the Academy (Roundtable)

Organizer(s): Marisa Lewis and Patricia Magazoni (U of Ottawa)

This roundtable invites scholars to collectively reflect and strategize on how to build solidarity relations within the academy. In this session, we seek perspectives on establishing decolonial approaches to knowledge and anti-racist pedagogies, promoting alliances between graduate students and faculty, and politicizing solidarity in Canadian educational institutions and spaces of knowledge. Thus, we invite presenters to discuss the ways structures of power and privilege are embedded in spaces of knowledge production and exchange, and how they impact the potential of better alliances and more ethical ways to approach knowledge, teaching, and difference in academic learning and working practices. How can academic communities envision better ‘practices of listening’ in graduate studies? What approaches, methods, and actions can we take collectively to address systemic problems of colonialism, racism, sexism, and privilege? What can solidarity ‘do’ in terms of building collaboration and alliance? These questions seek to guide discussions around topics that continue to affect the ways the academy prescribes difference in terms of teaching methods, positionality, and community building. 

Potential topics include, but are not limited to, the following: 

  • Decolonizing Methods
  • Solidarity and Kinship. 
  • Collective Forms of Action. 
  • Discourses of Privilege and Power 
  • Indigeneity and Resurgence
  • (Re) Definitions of “Minority Positioning” 
  • Pedagogy 
  • Student Unions and Organizations 
  • Race and Ethnicity 
  • Spaces and Spatiality 
  • Listening as Practice 
  • Frustration and Resistance
  • Gender and Sexual Politics 

Please submit by 15 November 2019 through the ACCUTE Proposal Submission Form.

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Queers Who Care: Disrupting the Libertarian Impulse in Queer Theory

Organizer(s): Nick Marsellas (Pittsburgh)

The canon of queer theory is decidedly suspicious of imposed morality. From the charmed circle of sexual relations to the deconstruction of normativity, much of the ethical impulse of early queer theory is towards a libertarian sense of self-sovereignty. We dress, we live, we fuck with defiance towards any attempt to impose morality, so the canon says. Yet queer theory’s fascination with self-determinism has created a rift between irreverent academic ideas of queerness and more community-driven queer projects that center healing, advocacy, interconnection, and liberation. What place is there in queer theory for these projects that don’t hold to the traditional libertarian impulse?

This panel invites papers that bridge the divide between queer theory’s suspicion of prescriptive morality and queer subjects’ work to establish communities whose members live in right relationship with one another.

Topics of interest for this panel may include but are not limited to:

  • Consent in queer spaces
  • Queer activist praxis
  • Teacher-student relationships
  • Queer healthcare, alternative care networks
  • Historical examples of queer care communities
  • The role of race in queer morality

Please submit by 15 November 2019 through the ACCUTE Proposal Submission Form.

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Reading Modernist Pain

Organizer(s): Jeremy Colangelo (Western)

In The Body in Painthe critic and philosopher Elaine Scarry writes that “the story of physical pain becomes as well a story about the expansive nature of human sentience, the felt-fact of aliveness that is often sheerly happy.” This paradox is at the center of modernism’s depiction of physical pain – momentary or chronic, controlled or debilitating, motivating or impairing. Pain is a quintessential expression of subjectivity, such that one can be of no doubt one feels it yet is completely unable to demonstrate that feeling to another. Yet to write about pain is also, inescapably, to write about the body. Moments of pain can also be thought of as the place where, as disability scholar Eli Clare writes in Brilliant Imperfection, “our fragile, resilient human body-minds interact with the world.” To write about pain is to write about contradictions, as befitting an experience that is at once so certain and so confused. 

This panel invites papers that explore these paradoxes as they arise in modernist literature. 

Please submit by 15 November 2019 through the ACCUTE Proposal Submission Form.

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Shame: Reconfiguring a Disciplinary Tool (Roundtable)

Organizer(s): Jennifer Andrews (University of New Brunswick)

Shame has a long and complex history in English studies.  As a word with multiple—even contradictory—meanings, ranging from “the right perception of what is improper and disgraceful” to regret over what might have been (OED), shame functions in a variety of ways in individual texts and in the discipline itself.  This panel explores the role shame plays in literature and in scholarly institutions as a means of regulating behaviour and ensuring that existing hierarchies remain.  How might talking about shame and naming it, whether in texts or in daily life, alter how we understand its impact?  What can we learn by examining narratives that portray shame and its effects—on those who do the shaming and those who are shamed?  How might literary examples of shame be instructional in thinking about who shame hurts and why in institutional contexts?

This roundtable is intended to bring participants together to have a discussion about shame’s roles in literature and life through short “micro-papers” of 5-7 pages that touch on any of the following:

  • shame in literary works
  • shame in institutional contexts
  • the origins and legacy of the word ‘shame’
  • the gendered and sexualized dimensions of shame, especially in the #MeToo era
  • personal experiences with being shamed in academia, with potential strategies and solutions for dealing with these situations
  • marginalized communities and shame

Please submit by 15 November 2019 through the ACCUTE Proposal Submission Form.

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Textual Be/longing in Contemporary Canadian Literatures

Organizer(s): Masa Torbica and Veronica Austen (Waterloo)

Sociocultural paradigms of belonging constitute both narrative and structural elements. As M. NourbeSe Philip points out in “Interview with an Empire,” “[e]mpire, colonialism, and racism work like the words on the page framing, or parenthesizing a space within which something life-fulfilling can take place” (Bla_k68). Within “the space that is Canada” (Bla_k68), the material conditions of belonging (varying from privilege and inclusion, to dispossession and oppression) continue to be shaped by settler colonialism and anti-Black racism. In light of these realities, how do contemporary writers use text materially to theorize, interrogate, and reimagine be/longing within the contested space of the settler colonial Canadian state? 

This panel will expand the discussion of textual depictions of be/longing by considering a wide range of meaning-making elements. Proposals might address:

  • poetic/narrative form as a conceptual framework
  • spatial arrangement of text
  • use of digital platforms
  • paratextual features
  • marketing strategies

Please submit by 15 November 2019 through the ACCUTE Proposal Submission Form.

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This Book is Trash!: Genres and Forms of Disposability, Ephemerality, and Disintegration

Organizer(s): Kelly McDevitt (Queen’s)

The canon of English literary studies is founded upon texts that endure, narratives that create bridges across centuries and cultures. Conservation, anthologising, translation, and allusion all serve to carry the meaning of these enduring texts into new media and new cultural contexts. This panel, however, invites papers to consider texts and genres that eschew durability. From pulp magazines, to spoken word poetry, to digital platforms like Snapchat, artists have capitalized on media of disposability, transience, and plain old trash to expand the categories of literature and posit new narrative possibilities. This panel invites papers that rummage through the ruffage and question the role of literary scholarship in valorizing narrative durability. 

Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Genres considered “trashy”: erotica/romance, smut, Young Adult fiction, comics, Science Fiction/cyberpunk, Fantasy, fanfiction, vernaculars
  • Genres of transience: airport literature, waiting room magazines, public advertising
  • Performance and public forms: spoken word, Fringe theatre, stand-up comedy, protest speeches/chants
  • Digital media: text messages, Twitter, Facebook, Snapchat, online magazines, blogs
  • Disposable forms: pulps, newspapers
  • Immaterial forms: projections, holograms
  • Found poetry, collage, sampling
  • Dying/obsolete forms

Please submit by 15 November 2019 through the ACCUTE Proposal Submission Form.

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What’s the Value of Interdisciplinary Research? (Roundtable)*

*Update: this panel is now a Joint-Sponsored Panel, in collaboration with CSDH-SCHN and CCLA-ACLC.

Organizer(s): Lai-Tze Fan (Waterloo)

This roundtable session discusses ways in which interdisciplinary research can foreground the strength of the humanities.

Recent critical terms added to and defined by SSHRC include “formal partnership,” “research-creation,” and “knowledge mobilization,” each of which encourages social sciences and humanities research to think beyond one’s own discipline and even beyond the university. While there are concerns about these changes, interdisciplinary research also offers the utmost opportunity for humanities researchers to bring humanities frameworks, discourse, and methods to conversations that are often dominated by the sciences, technology, and engineering. The move from “STEM” to “STEAM” risks treating the Arts as an afterthought; however, the humanities in fact play a vital role in training scholars in interpretation, storytelling, ethics and ethos, community engagement, creative praxis, and critical thinking.

This session recognizes the growth of interdisciplinary and otherwise non-traditional research projects, graduate programs, and methodologies in the humanities. The session follows a Congress 2019 panel on interdisciplinary researchers that incorporated perspectives from full-time and contingent faculty, alt-ac professionals, and scholars who work in policy and industry. Continuing this important conversation, this session invites speakers to address the value of the humanities in interdisciplinary research (in a roundtable discussion, not full papers). Proposed topics may include:

  • best practices for interdisciplinary research within or beyond the humanities
  • from “STEM” to “STEAM”
  • the role of humanities researchers in efforts of knowledge mobilization, especially for communicating to civic audiences
  • interdisciplinary research as training for alt-ac careers
  • anecdotes, lessons, and futures of interdisciplinarity in academia

Please submit by 15 November 2019 through the ACCUTE Proposal Submission Form.

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