Joint-Sponsored Panel CFPs

ACCUTE 2019

The following CFPs are for panels held at the ACCUTE conference that are jointly sponsored by ACCUTE and another organization.

Note: You must be a member in good standing, either of ACCUTE or of the co-sponsoring organization, to present on a joint panel. However, only ACCUTE members are eligible for travel funds from ACCUTE. The joint organizer may forward any rejected proposals that are not ideally suited to the panel for inclusion in the General Pool. If the proposal is strong enough, ACCUTE may still consider it for other programming during the conference, if space and time allow,  but at that point you will need to be an ACCUTE member.

Please see our FAQs for more information or email us.

Deadline for all paper proposals:

November 15, 2018

New this year:

All submissions for ACCUTE should be made online through the ACCUTE Proposal Submission Form

To view a CFP for a particular association, click on the association name below, or click here to jump down to the full list of panels.

Bibliographical Society of Canada (BSC): Oil and the Arts: Circles of Conversation around David Suzuki’s Controversial Honorary Degree

Canadian Association for American Studies (CAAS) 1: The Ghostly Presence in American Literature

CAAS 2: Contemporary Criminalities and Neo-Noir Cultures

Canadian Comparative Literature Association (CCLA) 1: Beyond Good: Reading a Toronto of the Urban Imaginary

CCLA 2: Poetics, Ideas, Structures: Situating the Poetic Object

Christianity and Literature Study Group (CLSG): The Inklings’ Circles of Conversation

Indigenous Literary Studies Association (ILSA): Community Formations, Intersectional Interventions, Trans-poetics, and Cultural Activisms in British Columbia and Quebec

International Gothic Association (IGA): Gothic Exchanges and Economies

Margaret Atwood Society (MAS): Margaret Atwood in Collaboration

North American Society for the Study of Romanticism (NASSR): 1. England in 1819 in 2019: Romantic Historicity 20 Years On; and 2. England in 1819 in 2019: Historical Romanticism 200 Years On

North American Victorian Studies Association (NAVSA) 1: Victorian Impacts

NAVSA 2: Victorian Wild Things

Victorian Studies Association of Ontario (VSAO): Victorian Fun, Amusement and Delight

Bibliographical Society of Canada (BSC)

Oil and the Arts: Circles of Conversation around David Suzuki’s Controversial Honorary Degree 

Organizer(s): Linda Quirk (University of Alberta) and Kristine Smitka (University of Alberta)

We invite “flash-papers” (approximately six-minutes long) for a roundtable on the controversy surrounding the University of Alberta’s decision to award an honorary degree to David Suzuki (June 2018). According to the U of A, “honorary degree recipients embody the university’s vision to inspire the human spirit through outstanding achievements” (“Honorary”). However, the academic and public opposition to Suzuki’s honorary degree highlights the terrain of debate surrounding what kinds of intellectual engagements serve the public good. Fraser Forbes, Dean of Engineering at the U of A, argued that the honorary degree proves the university has become “too disconnected from the people that we are meant to serve” (“U of A”) and Joseph Doucet, Dean of the School of Business, wrote that “this honorary degree has caused significant distress and anger to many Albertans… [who] are justifiably proud of the many… valuable contributions the energy and resource industries have made to this province” (“Message”). Many arguments were made in defence of the decision and this public controversy became a lightening-rod for a great deal of passionate rhetoric about academic freedom.

This roundtable seeks to address many of the obvious and less obvious topics that arose in this wide- ranging debate, such as:

  • donor relations to universities, including libraries and humanities departments
  • public-private partnerships in Arts programs
  • reverberations of this controversy in fields that do not obviously intersect with the energy sector

Please submit by 15 November 2018 through the ACCUTE Proposal Submission Form.

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Canadian Association for American Studies (CAAS) 1

The Ghostly Presence in American Literature

Organizer(s): Rita Bode (Trent University)

Critical commentary on ghost stories positions themes of haunting as more concerned with this world than the next. Cassy’s famous haunting of her degenerate “master” inUncle Tom’s Cabinprovides a telling paradigm of how (dis)embodiments in fiction explore individual psychologies and challenge social ills, sometimes severally, often simultaneously. This panel seeks new and insightful approaches to the handling of hauntings in American literature. Topics may include but are not limited to such considerations as: what constitutes a ghost? who qualifies? how does the familiar, the domestic and the material play into the power of hauntings? do representations of self-haunting, as we see, for example in Dickinson’s poetry, constitute a viable tradition in American letters? To what extent, as some critical theory suggests, does societal marginalization – based on race, ethnicity, gender, socio-economic and other factors – create a population of ghosts? Do ghosts and hauntings speak of moral corruption? These broad questions reflect a long-standing literary preoccupation in American letters that deserves renewed consideration in an era of denials. The panel is particularly interested in American literature of the nineteenth and early decades of the twentieth centuries, but later examples that show a continuity with these periods are also welcome.

Please submit by 15 November 2018 through the ACCUTE Proposal Submission Form.

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CAAS 2

Contemporary Criminalities and Neo-Noir Cultures

Organizer(s): Art Redding (York University)

How is crime imagined and depicted in the twenty-first century?  This panel invites submissions on any aspect of contemporary noir culture.  Critic Woody Haut has argued that, “pulp culture fiction . . . could not contend with the confrontational politics of the 1960s,” and as James Ellroy has remarked, “the noir subgenre officially died in 1960.” Nonetheless, it has proved remarkably resilient in its afterlife, subject to periodic revivals, revisionary critiques, and parodies, ranging fromThe Sopranosto Sin City. American noir films and pulp novels provide a remarkably durable set of cultural templates; a late twentieth century renaissance has grown, in the twenty-first century, global, to encompass bestselling crime fictions by European (Stieg Larsson; Philip Kerr), Asian (Wang Shuo; Vikram Chandra) and other writers from around the world. The popular noir series published by Akashic books will soon include over 100 titles: Baghdad NoirZagreb NoirRio NoirHaiti Noir(two volumes), and more. There is even a Toronto Noir, and Anvil Press published the collection Vancouver Noir. What explains the remarkable global resurgence of noir in the 21st century? And what cultural purpose is noir serving today?

Please submit by 15 November 2018 through the ACCUTE Proposal Submission Form.

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Canadian Comparative Literature Association (CCLA) 1

Beyond Good: Reading a Toronto of the Urban Imaginary 

Organizer(s): Lee Frew (Glendon College, York University) and Kathryn Franklin (University of Toronto, Scarborough)

For the last few decades, there has been a steady rise in scholarship devoted to Canadian urban fiction (see Edwards and Ivison, 2005; Hill, 2012; Fraile-Marcos, 2014). While tropes of the Canadian landscape and wilderness have long dominated literary discourse, Canadian urban literature has had a powerful, albeit often invisible, history, articulating a counter-narrative to myths of the land such as Northrop Frye’s notion of the garrison mentality. Toronto, to be sure, has featured prominently in a number of canonical texts that reflect upon “Toronto the Good,” which critics tend to cite before moving their attention to more contemporary works that signal Toronto’s emergence as a cosmopolitan global city (see Harris, 2010; Rosenthal, 2011). Such critical work on the diversity of voices—even dissenting ones—in the contemporary imagining of Toronto has certainly been necessitated by the city’s dramatic demographic and cultural changes since the 1970s. But, as Caroline Rosenthal observes, another part of the current process of Toronto becoming “an imaginative city” includes what has thus far been only a preliminary discussion of earlier Toronto fiction “as a significant corpus of literature,” and one that can serve “as a way of symbolically building the city.” Indeed, Amy Lavender Harris’s Imagining Toronto Library, her magisterial online bibliography of “literary works engaging with Toronto,” attests to the size of this largely overlooked body of writing. What can non-canonical texts add to the ways Toronto is imagined in its fiction and poetry? What are the hidden gems and lost treasures of Torontonian fiction? What are Toronto’s important non-anglophone works? What do Toronto’s marginalized voices from the past have to say? With its eye on Toronto’s imaginative future, this panel seeks to redress some of the cultural amnesia that has been inherent to this city’s dynamic history.

Please submit by 15 November 2018 through the ACCUTE Proposal Submission Form.

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CCLA 2 

Poetics, Ideas, Structures: Situating the Poetic Object

Organizer(s): Julia Polyck-O’Neill (Brock University)

In her 1988 essay “On Conceptual Art,” Adrian Piper explains that she turned to language as a primary medium within her artistic practice because she wanted to explore, among other things, “objects that both refer to abstract ideas that situate those very objects in new conceptual and spatiotemporal matrices, and also draw attention to the spatiotemporal matrices in which they’re embedded” (424). This panel invites participants to consider the different ways language can be considered a medium for the creative, often transfigurative exploration of material realities and histories. Proposals might, along with other possibilities, compare historic poetic narratives with contemporary revisionist correctives, analyze experimental and/or political poetic projects in literature and/or visual or performing arts, that explore underlying structures, or call attention to alternate readings of poetics, creative histories, or the geographies in which these are each embedded. This panel particularly invites decolonial approaches to language and space as it relates to these topics.

Please submit by 15 November 2018 through the ACCUTE Proposal Submission Form.

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Christianity and Literature Study Group (CLSG)

The Inklings’ Circles of Conversation

Organizer(s): Monika Hilder and Stephen Dunning (Inklings Institute of Canada)

The Inklings Institute of Canada, members of CLSG (Christianity and Literature Study Group) affiliated with ACCUTE, is having a session on the foremost Oxford Inklings, C.S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien, Charles Williams, and Owen Barfield, as well as their mentors George MacDonald, G.K. Chesterton, and friend Dorothy L. Sayers. In the tradition of the Inklings members’ own circle of conversation, which had a transformative impact on contemporary culture, and in celebration of the continuing circles of conversation and literary art that their legacy inspires today, we invite a wide range of topics, including philosophy, aesthetics, science, theology, psychology, social justice, gender studies, ecology, and education. Alternate formats, including multimedia genres and creative writing, are particularly welcome.

Please submit by 15 November 2018 through the ACCUTE Proposal Submission Form.

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Indigenous Literary Studies Association (ILSA)

Community Formations, Intersectional Interventions, Trans-poetics, and Cultural Activisms in British Columbia and Quebec

Organizer(s): Mathieu Aubin (UBC Okanagan Campus) and Lianne Moyes (Université de Montréal)

This panel invites scholars, writers, and knowledge-keepers to draw connections among artists, literary communities and collectives, small presses, and cultural events in British Columbia and Quebec, and thereby explore affinities and dissonances between (and within) these regions. In this way, it aims to bring into conversation the cutting-edge work being carried out in different geographical spaces, forms, and languages. In contributing to debates about trans-poetics and social justice across national, language, racial, and cultural divides, this panel opens a space to address intersectional interventions that are feminist, Indigenous, and/or LGBTQI2S, amongst others.

Focusing on the second half of the twentieth century to the present, explorations may include, but are not limited to:

  • how earlier cultural activist efforts in British Columbia and Quebec interrupted whiteness, monolingualism, heteronormativity, and capitalism
  • the conditions of possibility for these sites and cultural events, such as visible and invisible forms of labour, modes of financial and institutional support, as well as collective dynamics
  • the limitations (and possibilities) of affinity within and among cultural sites and practices
  • instances of cooperation between small presses; role of special issues
  • the role that technology (digital or analogue) has played in valorizing, preserving, and recirculating collectives’ cultural politics to larger audiences

Please submit by 15 November 2018 through the ACCUTE Proposal Submission Form.

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International Gothic Association (IGA)

Gothic Exchanges and Economies

Organizer(s): Karen Macfarlane (Mount Saint Vincent University)

This joint session seeks proposals for papers relating to the concept of Gothic economies and/or exchanges, widely defined. Papers may focus on any elements of monetary exchange, economic status, economic downturns and trends, economies or exchanges of knowledge, exchanges between states of being, between bodies, between groups and any other definitions or interpretations of the term as they can be applied to Gothic texts.  Papers may focus on literature, film, television, popular culture or any other medium.

Please submit by 15 November 2018 through the ACCUTE Proposal Submission Form.

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Margaret Atwood Society (MAS)

Margaret Atwood in Collaboration 

Organizer(s): Karen Macfarlane (Mount Saint Vincent University)

Margaret Atwood is generally recognized for her single-authored works. But recently public attention has turned to her collaborations with artists such as Johnnie Christmas and Ken Steacy in forthcoming graphic novels and comics such as Angel Catbirdand War Bears. These may be Atwood’s most recent collaborations but they are far from her only ones. This joint session seeks proposals that address works that Atwood has produced in collaboration with other authors, artists, composers, critics, and others. Papers may, for example, address her early collaboration with artists like Charles Pachter, Maryann and Aryann Kovalski, with composers like Tobin Stokes, and authors like Naomi Alderman. Papers may also address the issue of failed collaborations.

Please submit by 15 November 2018 through the ACCUTE Proposal Submission Form.

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North American Society for the Study of Romanticism (NASSR) 1 and 2

England in 1819 in 2019: Romantic Historicity 20 Years On

And

England in 1819 in 2019: Historical Romanticism 200 Years On

Organizer(s): Miranda Burgess (University of British Columbia) and Alexander Dick (University of British Columbia)

Few books have shaped Romantic literary studies during the last two decades more than James Chandler’s England in 1819: The Politics of Literary Culture and the Case of Romantic Historicism. Published in 1999, English in 1819extended the critique of Romantic ideology that inaugurated the historical turn of the 1980s. But it also made a case for reading Romanticism as peculiarly conscious of itself as a “moment” in history—what Hazlitt called the “spirit of the times”—that established the preconditions for the modern idea of history. These two panels invite reflections on our current moment in literary-historical studies by engaging Chandler’s theses from new perspectives that have emerged since its publication. We are especially interested in work that widens Chandler’s frame beyond its European setting, including work on comparative imperialisms, Indigenous exchanges, the global south, and archipelagic/maritime perspectives. The first panel is designed to examine directly Chandler’s theoretical premises; the second will re-consider literary texts from or around 1819 (not exclusively those featured in England in 1819) in light of recent developments in the Romantic historicist studies that Chandler’s book delineated. Although we regard the panels as offering opportunities for distinct modes of engagement (“theoretical” and “applied”), overlap is unavoidable and encouraged. We invite speakers to identify on which of the panels they would prefer to participate, keeping in mind that they will be speaking to both.

Please submit by 15 November 2018 through the ACCUTE Proposal Submission Form.

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North American Victorian Studies Association (NAVSA) 1

Victorian Impacts

Organizer(s): Margaret Linley (Simon Fraser University)

In a social media context, impact can be a measure of success. In an environmental setting, impact is often measured by adverse effects of human development. Impact can be violent, as in a sharp blow or collision between things, or it can be positive, as in a lasting influence. How might we define the concept of impact in a Victorian context? What impacts did Victorians have on their world? What things and events made an impact on them? What are the effects of such impacts, and which Victorian impacts are still with us today? What are the literary forms of impact?

Possible topics include:

  • Impact Zones
  • Sudden impacts, collisions, catastrophes
  • Planetary, anthropogenic, and other environmental impacts
  • Influence and aftermath
  • Impact as effect, as in first impressions and lasting impressions
  • Impact and affect – euphoria, rapture, transport
  • Impact as a mark, material trace, or footprint
  • Impacts of material print culture, including impressions, engravings, stamps, typeface, embossing, print runs
  • Impact’s others: boredom, loss, failure, avoidance, delay, stillness
  • Post-impact: consequences, ends, remains, results

Please submit by 15 November 2018 through the ACCUTE Proposal Submission Form.

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NAVSA 2

Victorian Wild Things

Organizer(s): Margaret Linley (Simon Fraser University)

Wildness, weirdness, strange people, places, things, and events have always captured the imagination and shaped the way we interact with and produce our world.  This panel invites papers that explore the significance of “wild things” in Victorian literature. How did Victorians use literature to express, confront, and even tame strangeness? How do wild things generate, infiltrate, or determine literary forms?

Topics may include but are not limited to:

  • Madness, intensity, unconventionality, opposition
  • Animals
  • Wild spaces, including wilderness, its objects and inhabitants
  • Representations of indigenity, nativeness, and nativity
  • Outcasts, misfits, and criminals
  • Riots, uprisings, and spontaneous social happenings
  • Exotica
  • Erotica
  • Wild acts, gestures, (mis)behaviours
  • Wild thoughts, ideas, feelings, and affects
  • Empire and wild things
  • At home with wild things
  • Massive natural phenomena, including wild weather and natural disasters

Please submit by 15 November 2018 through the ACCUTE Proposal Submission Form.

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Victorian Studies Association of Ontario (VSAO)

Victorian Fun, Amusement, and Delight

Organizer(s): Emily Rothwell (Carleton) and Lindsay Young (Queen’s)

From Edward Lear’s nonsensical limericks, the Queen’s laughable rage in Wonderland, to illustrations by Phiz and the Punch artists, the Victorian era was no stranger to merry-making. In one sense, the Victorian era was a bastion of prudish puritanical “no nonsense,” of earnest rationalism, but in another, it saw the flowering of imaginative merriment through the emergence of leisure time for all classes. The result was a rich and complex tapestry of paradoxical fun: fashionable séances, pulp novels, picnicking in garden cemeteries, vaudeville and mannered drawing room revels. This panel invites papers that examine the ways in which fun was imagined and represented in this era. In addition, papers might inquire as to how the imagined and lived amusements of Victorians could be seen as cultural representations of the following: their hidden anxieties, their emotional histories, their desires for escapist revelry (and, for some, a fleeting chance to seek moments of agency or of carnivalesque fun).

Possible themes might include but are not limited to:

  • print culture and humour writing, editorials and illustration
  • theme parks, circuses, concert halls, cartographies of fun and amusing voyages
  • literary representations of fun, leisure, laughter, play, silly joy, wordplay, nonsense, absurdity, puns, or the amusingly bizarre
  • imperial amusements
  • erotica, celebrity, pulp, children’s fiction, detective, romance, and speculative fiction
  • interior design, design print culture and spaces of fun in domestic and childhood culture

Please submit by 15 November 2018 through the ACCUTE Proposal Submission Form.

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