Board-Sponsored Panel CFPs

ACCUTE 2020

  

The following CFPs are for panels on professional and disciplinary concerns organized by ACCUTE members.

  

Note: You must be an ACCUTE member in good standing to present on a board panel. The board organizer will forward any rejected proposals that are not ideally suited to the panel for inclusion in the General Pool.

Please email us if you have any questions or concerns.

Deadline for all paper proposals:

November 15, 2019

All submissions for ACCUTE should be made online through the ACCUTE Proposal Submission Form

To view a CFP, click on the panel name below, or scroll down to the full list of panels.

Contract Academic Faculty (CAF) Caucus: Contracting a Commitment to Decolonizing and Indigenizing Curriculum (Roundtable)

Committee for Professional Concerns (CPC) 1: Why Do I (Have to) Cite Like That? (Roundtable)

CPC 2: Confronting Campus Culture: Tensions in Research, Pedagogy, and Curriculum (Roundtable)

Graduate Student Caucus (GSC): Diversity, Equity, and Inclusivity in Graduate Studies (Roundtable)

Contract Academic Faculty (CAF) Caucus 1

Contracting a Commitment to Decolonizing and Indigenizing Curriculum (Roundtable)

Organizer(s): Ann Gagné (University of Toronto, Mississauga)

As a direct response to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission Calls to Action colleges and universities have posted for subject matter experts to lead reviews to decolonize and indigenize curriculum. These positions come under various names such as Indigenous Educational Developer, Indigenous Scholar, or Indigenous Educational Development Consultant. More often than not these positions are contract positions with precarious renewal structures or with no opportunities for renewal at all. These positions vary anywhere from one semester to three years. 

This roundtable seeks to discuss the repercussions of contracting a commitment to decolonizing curriculum. Participants may bring in experience applying to these positions, being part of the hiring committee, or part of a department staffing these positions. Some questions to ponder may include:

  • What does contracting folk to do this work say about the commitment to this important work?
  • In what ways can departments demonstrate a commitment to decolonization along with a commitment to non-contract work?
  • What are some of the factors, spaces, and interview practices that need to be in place for hires to be supported and successful?

Please submit by 15 November 2019 through the ACCUTE Proposal Submission Form.

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Committee for Professional Concerns (CPC) 1

Why Do I (Have to) Cite Like That? (Roundtable)

Organizer(s): Kit Dobson (Mount Royal)

Why and how do we cite others’ arguments, in a discipline that privileges original readings over obedient ones? Whom do we cite, and whom do we ignore, in a professional community that endeavours to practice inclusion before canonicity? When do we respond first to emerging voices, in a discourse deeply influenced by a handful of star theorists? How are we—as scholars in English in particular—to cite right? How ought we to teach this subtle, and discipline-specific, art of relationship and responsibility? Presuming, pace Dionne Brand, that no citation is neutral, this Committee for Professional Concerns roundtable invites discussion of citation and its role in our scholarly practice.

Please submit by 15 November 2019 through the ACCUTE Proposal Submission Form.

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CPC 2

Confronting Campus Culture: Tensions in Research, Pedagogy, and Curriculum (Roundtable)

Organizer(s): Kit Dobson (Mount Royal)

This Committee for Professional Concerns roundtable seeks to explore the influence that campus culture has on academics’ ability to conduct research that may be seen as being at odds with campus missions and values yet sit squarely within the realm of academic freedom. Participants can share experiences they may have had with campus cultures such as:

  • Studying policies and procedures that may be critical of administration;
  • Working within the complex field of academic integrity, intellectual property, and student success;
  • The push to monetize within corporate educational models;
  • Modifying course curriculum to make it more inclusive and representative of campuses at the micro and macro level; and / or
  • Confronting a “chilly climate” as a sessional, tenured faculty member, or administrator.

Please submit by 15 November 2019 through the ACCUTE Proposal Submission Form.

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Graduate Student Caucus (GSC)

Diversity, Equity, and Inclusivity in Graduate Studies (Roundtable)

Organizer(s): Nahmi Lee (Western)

As graduate students, we are continually surrounded by a vocabulary of inclusivity and reform in the university. Terms like diversity, equity, and inclusivity are consistently used in documents prescribing everything from policies on hiring and student enrolment to behavioural expectations and teaching best practices. However, in their constant use, these terms risk becoming blunted and worn down.

The GSC invites graduate students and faculty alike to renew these words for a new generation of scholars, to parse and to differentiate their use, while considering the practice of their application. In a roundtable format, we ask panelists to discuss individual experiences of and strategies for implementing diversity, equity, and inclusivity within the context of graduate studies; what do or could these terms mean for the current graduate student? How might we fulfill them in practice? Within the limited institutional power and turnover rates of graduate students, how could these terms be realized in the capacity of a TA position, an RA position, or as a developing researcher? What specific strategies do faculty members use or recommend—at the level of the syllabus, of classroom discussion, even of program structure—to realize these goals in support of graduate students, specifically? Does a more useful or precise vocabulary exist for the university culture we would ideally work toward?

Please submit by 15 November 2019 through the ACCUTE Proposal Submission Form.

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